Tag Archives: News

Celebrating Fresh Thinking – Professorial Lecture Series

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution to academe made by Professor Mathieu Sellier and Professor Greg O’Beirne in the next presentation in the Professorial Lecture Series for 2019.

Date :    Thursday, 5 September, from 4.30 – 6.30pm

Venue: E14 – Engineering Core

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend this lecture, to actively support our new professors, and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

‘Moving the boundaries of fluid mechanics’  – Presented by Professor Mathieu Sellier

Abstract: Many flows encountered in our daily lives involve a moving boundary. The shape of a raindrop, for example, evolves as it falls through the air. Likewise, the free surface of a river deforms as it encounters obstacles. While the mathematical ingredients required to describe such flows have been known since the late 19th century and are encapsulated in the infamous Navier-Stokes equations, solving complex flows with a moving boundary or interface still poses significant challenges and provides stimulating cross-disciplinary research opportunities. The question at the centre of the research I will present is “if information about the evolution of a moving interface is available, can we indirectly infer unknown properties of the flow?” Such a question falls in the realm of inverse problems for which one knows the effect but is looking for the cause. Specifically, I will talk about how it is possible to estimate the fluid properties of lava just by looking at how it flows or what is the best way to rotate a pan to cook the perfect crêpe.

‘Speech, noise, and the Matrix’ – Presented by Professor Greg A. O’Beirne

People with hearing impairment or auditory processing problems find it harder than most to understand speech in background noise, or when parts of the speech signal are missing or distorted. Despite this, most hearing tests still present either pure tones or single words in quiet, and usually use expensive equipment to do it. 

To overcome these shortcomings and better assess the ability to communicate in challenging acoustic environments, my lab has produced a number of innovative adaptive tests of speech intelligibility and auditory processing. These include i) the UCAST-FW – a filtered word test for the diagnosis of auditory processing disorder; ii) internet-based Digit Triplet Tests to screen for sensorineural hearing loss in New Zealand English, Te Reo Māori, and Malay; and iii) the University of Canterbury Auditory-Visual Matrix Sentence Test – a speech-in-noise test in New Zealand English and Malay that allows rapid testing of adults and school-age children, including their ability to use visual cues to supplement the auditory signal.

I’ll discuss how permanent hearing impairment reduces speech clarity even when sounds are audible, and how the testing platform we’ve developed provides an integrated set of tools for improving hearing screening and speech testing in New Zealand, Australia, and south-east Asia.

 

CELEBRATING FRESH THINKING: PROFESSORIAL LECTURE SERIES

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution to academe made by Professor Richard Watt and Professor Jędrzej Białkowski in the next presentation in the Professorial Lecture Series for 2019.

Date:               Thursday 1 August from 4.30 – 6.00pm

Location:        E14 – Engineering Core

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend this lecture, to actively support our new Professors, and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

“The Economics of Music and the Music of Economics” – Presented by Professor Richard Watt, Department of Economics & Finance

Economics, in one way or another, is concerned with decision making – choosing the optimal course of action from among those available. As such, one of the principal applications of economics is to study decision making along the value chain of goods and services in an economy, or more generally, decision making in “markets”. A study of a market begins with the entrepreneurial actions of bringing together inputs (raw materials, labour, capital, etc.) to create something useful, then the resulting goods and services must be made available to the consuming public (decisions around transportation, and retailing), and finally the consumers themselves decide which of them to consume (depending on their income, their preferences, and the prices of the goods and services that are available). Of all of the goods and services that circulate in an economy, “music” is one of the most fascinating, with a series of particular circumstances that have tested standard economic theory in many ways. In this talk, Professor Watt will outline the economics of the “music market”, touching on its special characteristics and the economic institutions that have evolved, and that continue to evolve, to contribute to the music market being functional, profitable, and welfare enhancing.

“Greener than a Greenback: Might the idea of socially responsible investing change the finance industry?” – Presented by Professor Jedrzej Bialkowski, Department of Economics and Finance. 

Since the beginning of the 21st century, the idea of socially responsible (or sustainable and responsible) investing (SRI) has become increasingly popular, attracting a substantial amount of investors’ money and moving from a niche investing strategy to a mainstream one. SRI market participants typically seek to achieve financial returns combined with consideration of some aspect of firms’ environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) profiles. Given the rapid proliferation of green financial products, the increasing assets under management and the differences across the products, it is important to understand this growth and the investor demand behind it.

Professor Jedrzej Bialkowski will discuss the past, current trends and the challenges faced by so-called green finance. In particular, he will focus on the behaviour of SRI investors and the performance of different types of assets in terms of risk/return profile and exposure to ESG values. Light will be shed on the importance of regulations for the development of socially responsible investing.

Professor Ian Wright

Deputy Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Tuarua

 

 

Information and Question session – Technology Information for Staff

Have you seen the Technology Information for Staff website yet? Got questions?

Martin Budd, IT Applications Training Specialist and author of Intercom Tech Tips, will be talking next week about the Technology Information for Staff website and answering questions.

11.15 – 12.00 noon, Friday 9 November
in Forestry Lecture Theatre 3.

Please email Catherine Woods anytime before 6 November with your intention to attend, so that we have enough printed materials.

Please note that we will also spend a few minutes giving an update on the speakers confirmed for the Professional Development Day, 11 April 2019.

The Technology Information for Staff website is a portal to the everyday technology things you need to know while doing your job here at UC. If you are looking for general IT information, this is the  place to start. It covers everything from passwords to training, remote access to electronic filing, SPAM to traveling with your mobile devices, Skype for Business to ergonomics, and more.

The Technology Information for Staff web site also serves as an IT Induction for new staff, so please direct new staff members to it. (It is also on the New Staff Orientation Checklist). If you are a new staff member you can work through it, starting on your first day and continuing from there.

To learn more about the Technology Information for Staff website read the Intercom Blog post: https://blogs.canterbury.ac.nz/intercom/2018/07/25/technology-information-for-staff/


Have you seen our Archive of Tech Tips?

For Professional Development, see the Learning and Development website.

Half-yearly result shows steady financial performance for UC

Thank you to all staff for your sustained effort in recruiting and retaining students, for the ongoing commitment to world-class excellence and research and the extraordinary work undertaken to transform both the physical campus and our services.

The University of Canterbury (UC) is continuing to show steady financial performance, the six-monthly result to the end of June 2018 shows.

UC has advanced its growth strategy, starting the academic year with a big increase in new-to-UC students and receiving a further boost with a 22% increase in mid-year enrolments.

Our aim is to continue to grow the number of students coming to the University and staying in Canterbury, to increase research efforts and academic and technical job opportunities, and to collaborate with institutions in the region.

In the last year, UC was the fastest growing New Zealand university, attracting record numbers of students from Auckland and Wellington, as well as students and researchers from around the country and the world.

In the last 12 months we have had a record number of postgraduate students, including over 1,000 doctoral students. UC also achieved a record level of research income, hosted the greatest number of academic visitors in our history and attracted record levels of philanthropic support for scholarships and research.

Emerging from the difficult post-quake environment, UC has learnt much in the past eight years. It has a deep understanding of how to respond to a crisis, it is much more open to collaboration, and it has developed tools to manage with constrained resources.

The six-monthly result to the end of June 2018 shows continued steady financial performance as the University competes strongly in the commercial environment of student recruitment locally and globally, while investing in exciting new, state-of-the-art facilities.

UC is completing over $1.1 billion of capital investment, largely in research and teaching infrastructure to support 21st century science and engineering, new business models and digital technologies.

The College of Science’s new five-storey Ernest Rutherford building and the College of Engineering’s state-of-the-art facilities are now fully open, while the University is completing the Rehua building for the College of Education, Health and Human Development, the MBA and Business Taught Masters Programmes and the Centre of Entrepreneurship led by the College of Business and Law, and Haere-roa, the new University of Canterbury Students’ Association (UCSA) building.

The University’s $5 million surplus represents the result of operations to 30 June 2018, which is not representative of the full year where the cycle of earnings is annual. The majority of student-related earnings are made in the first half of the financial year.  The current projection for the 31 December 2018 annual result is a surplus of $5 million.

For the first half of 2018, UC recognised revenue of $191.4 million (compared to 2016’s half-yearly result of $185.4 million). By the year end, UC is projecting to have increased its Equivalent Full Time Student (EFTS) numbers over 2017 in both domestic and full-fee paying (international) new-to-UC students, and in student numbers overall.

Operating expenditure was $186.4 million in the same period (30 June 2017: $172.2 million). 

The University continues to maintain adequate cash balances, with total cash holdings at 30 June 2018 (defined as current and term deposits) $295.3 million (30 June 2017: $349.0 million; 31 December 2017: $252.6 million).  The University receives the significant majority of its operating cash revenue early in the year during its main enrolment period. These balances are almost entirely committed to funding the University’s capital investment plan and EFTS expansion initiatives.

Net tangible assets per security ($1,000 face value) as at 30 June 2018 were $27,488 (30 June 2017: $27,878; 31 December 2017: $27,359).

Ngā mihi,

Dr Rod Carr
Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Whakarae

NASA internships now open to New Zealand students

Under a new agreement between NASA and the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE), tertiary students can now apply for internships with the space administration.

Scholarships will be available for up to four successful Aotearoa New Zealand students for NASA’s June 2019 intake, courtesy of the New Zealand Space Agency. Costs associated with the internship including travel, living costs and NASA’s administrative fees will be covered under the scholarship.

The successful students will attend the Ames Centre base for a 10-16 week internship in Silicon Valley. Under the guidance of a NASA mentor, they will also have the opportunity to build a network of contacts both within the space administration, the US and the pool of other international students taking part in the programme. 

This opportunity is for high-achieving Aotearoa New Zealand students to work with experts in space-related fields and have access to some of the world’s most advanced research facilities.

The scholarship aims to support Aotearoa New Zealand’s students studying space-related activities and will give our future innovators, entrepreneurs and scientists a head-start in their careers by enabling them to develop technical skills at a world-leading space agency. 

The internship will give students access to international professional networks and develop their understanding of the global space economy. 

The application process is two-phased with candidates first being selected by the New Zealand Space Agency.

Following selection by MBIE, local  finalists will be recommended to NASA who will then choose their overall finalists from the broader pool of 12 other countries.

Applications will be open from mid-September and close mid-October. 

For more, see www.mbie.govt.nz/nasa