Tag Archives: News

Appointment of General Counsel and Registrar

I am very pleased to advise that we have successfully appointed Adela Kardos to the position of General Counsel and Registrar. Adela comes to us with a wealth of experience and is currently the General Counsel/Head of Legal Services at Christchurch City Council (CCC).  With her Bachelor of Laws with Honours from UC, Adela has been a Barrister and Solicitor of the High Court of New Zealand since 2007. She currently manages a team of 16, including 12 lawyers and plays a critical role as a Member of the Council’s Executive Team providing strategic and legal advice on both governance and operational matters.

Adela has been with the CCC for the past 9 years and is looking forward to taking on a new challenge, she has a passion for the Education sector and will be joining us from Monday, 3 August 2020.

It’s time to join The Conversation

The Conversation is an independent source of news and views, sourced from the academic and research community and delivered direct to the public.

It’s aim is to enable better understanding of current affairs and complex issues by working with university academics and researchers to unlock their deep expertise for use by the wider public, and we’re encouraging all UC academics to sign up>

This free resource has become one of Australia’s largest independent news and commentary sites. Around 35% of readers are from outside Australia, with editions for Africa, Canada, France, United Kingdom, United States and global readerships.

As well as a respected media resource, The Conversation is a source of ideas, experts and free content (under creative commons) with its articles often quoted and republished in mainstream media around the world. It’s a way that academics and researchers can persuade influential people outside their field – including funding assessors, politicians, the media, industry and the public – that their work matters.

 

Those with experience in Australian universities are already aware of the positive impact contributing to The Conversation can have on academic careers – via awareness of research, researchers and increased citations.

Why it works – trusted content: All The Conversation authors are academics and researchers; you must be a member of an academic or research institution to write for The Conversation.

Its editors are professional journalists who can help create high quality content that’s also easy to read.

The Conversation codes of conduct ensure accuracy. All articles carry a disclosure statement listing any potential conflict, and the authors retain final sign-off on all their articles. The content is subject to an Editorial Charter to ensure it is evidence-based, independent and trusted writing.

Topics covered include (but are not limited to):

  • Arts + Culture
  • Business + Economy
  • Cities
  • Education
  • Environment + Energy
  • FactCheck
  • Health + Medicine
  • Politics + Society
  • Science + Technology

For more information, contact the UC Comms team>

 

Celebrating Fresh Thinking – Professorial Lecture Series

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution to academe made by Professor Mathieu Sellier and Professor Greg O’Beirne in the next presentation in the Professorial Lecture Series for 2019.

Date :    Thursday, 5 September, from 4.30 – 6.30pm

Venue: E14 – Engineering Core

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend this lecture, to actively support our new professors, and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

‘Moving the boundaries of fluid mechanics’  – Presented by Professor Mathieu Sellier

Abstract: Many flows encountered in our daily lives involve a moving boundary. The shape of a raindrop, for example, evolves as it falls through the air. Likewise, the free surface of a river deforms as it encounters obstacles. While the mathematical ingredients required to describe such flows have been known since the late 19th century and are encapsulated in the infamous Navier-Stokes equations, solving complex flows with a moving boundary or interface still poses significant challenges and provides stimulating cross-disciplinary research opportunities. The question at the centre of the research I will present is “if information about the evolution of a moving interface is available, can we indirectly infer unknown properties of the flow?” Such a question falls in the realm of inverse problems for which one knows the effect but is looking for the cause. Specifically, I will talk about how it is possible to estimate the fluid properties of lava just by looking at how it flows or what is the best way to rotate a pan to cook the perfect crêpe.

‘Speech, noise, and the Matrix’ – Presented by Professor Greg A. O’Beirne

People with hearing impairment or auditory processing problems find it harder than most to understand speech in background noise, or when parts of the speech signal are missing or distorted. Despite this, most hearing tests still present either pure tones or single words in quiet, and usually use expensive equipment to do it. 

To overcome these shortcomings and better assess the ability to communicate in challenging acoustic environments, my lab has produced a number of innovative adaptive tests of speech intelligibility and auditory processing. These include i) the UCAST-FW – a filtered word test for the diagnosis of auditory processing disorder; ii) internet-based Digit Triplet Tests to screen for sensorineural hearing loss in New Zealand English, Te Reo Māori, and Malay; and iii) the University of Canterbury Auditory-Visual Matrix Sentence Test – a speech-in-noise test in New Zealand English and Malay that allows rapid testing of adults and school-age children, including their ability to use visual cues to supplement the auditory signal.

I’ll discuss how permanent hearing impairment reduces speech clarity even when sounds are audible, and how the testing platform we’ve developed provides an integrated set of tools for improving hearing screening and speech testing in New Zealand, Australia, and south-east Asia.

 

CELEBRATING FRESH THINKING: PROFESSORIAL LECTURE SERIES

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution to academe made by Professor Richard Watt and Professor Jędrzej Białkowski in the next presentation in the Professorial Lecture Series for 2019.

Date:               Thursday 1 August from 4.30 – 6.00pm

Location:        E14 – Engineering Core

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend this lecture, to actively support our new Professors, and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

“The Economics of Music and the Music of Economics” – Presented by Professor Richard Watt, Department of Economics & Finance

Economics, in one way or another, is concerned with decision making – choosing the optimal course of action from among those available. As such, one of the principal applications of economics is to study decision making along the value chain of goods and services in an economy, or more generally, decision making in “markets”. A study of a market begins with the entrepreneurial actions of bringing together inputs (raw materials, labour, capital, etc.) to create something useful, then the resulting goods and services must be made available to the consuming public (decisions around transportation, and retailing), and finally the consumers themselves decide which of them to consume (depending on their income, their preferences, and the prices of the goods and services that are available). Of all of the goods and services that circulate in an economy, “music” is one of the most fascinating, with a series of particular circumstances that have tested standard economic theory in many ways. In this talk, Professor Watt will outline the economics of the “music market”, touching on its special characteristics and the economic institutions that have evolved, and that continue to evolve, to contribute to the music market being functional, profitable, and welfare enhancing.

“Greener than a Greenback: Might the idea of socially responsible investing change the finance industry?” – Presented by Professor Jedrzej Bialkowski, Department of Economics and Finance. 

Since the beginning of the 21st century, the idea of socially responsible (or sustainable and responsible) investing (SRI) has become increasingly popular, attracting a substantial amount of investors’ money and moving from a niche investing strategy to a mainstream one. SRI market participants typically seek to achieve financial returns combined with consideration of some aspect of firms’ environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) profiles. Given the rapid proliferation of green financial products, the increasing assets under management and the differences across the products, it is important to understand this growth and the investor demand behind it.

Professor Jedrzej Bialkowski will discuss the past, current trends and the challenges faced by so-called green finance. In particular, he will focus on the behaviour of SRI investors and the performance of different types of assets in terms of risk/return profile and exposure to ESG values. Light will be shed on the importance of regulations for the development of socially responsible investing.

Professor Ian Wright

Deputy Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Tuarua

 

 

Information and Question session – Technology Information for Staff

Have you seen the Technology Information for Staff website yet? Got questions?

Martin Budd, IT Applications Training Specialist and author of Intercom Tech Tips, will be talking next week about the Technology Information for Staff website and answering questions.

11.15 – 12.00 noon, Friday 9 November
in Forestry Lecture Theatre 3.

Please email Catherine Woods anytime before 6 November with your intention to attend, so that we have enough printed materials.

Please note that we will also spend a few minutes giving an update on the speakers confirmed for the Professional Development Day, 11 April 2019.

The Technology Information for Staff website is a portal to the everyday technology things you need to know while doing your job here at UC. If you are looking for general IT information, this is the  place to start. It covers everything from passwords to training, remote access to electronic filing, SPAM to traveling with your mobile devices, Skype for Business to ergonomics, and more.

The Technology Information for Staff web site also serves as an IT Induction for new staff, so please direct new staff members to it. (It is also on the New Staff Orientation Checklist). If you are a new staff member you can work through it, starting on your first day and continuing from there.

To learn more about the Technology Information for Staff website read the Intercom Blog post: https://blogs.canterbury.ac.nz/intercom/2018/07/25/technology-information-for-staff/


Have you seen our Archive of Tech Tips?

For Professional Development, see the Learning and Development website.