Tag Archives: phd

Postgraduate research: Airbnb study

Kia Ora,

My name is Shayan Zarakhsh and I am a PhD candidate in Marketing at the Department of Management, Marketing and Entrepreneurship (MME), University of Canterbury. My research relates to Airbnb users’ perceptions of the company and its impacts. I am writing to invite you to participate in an interview as part of the research data collection, providing that:

  • You have not attended my PhD confirmation defense; and
  • You have stayed at an Airbnb accommodation at least one time within the previous year.

There is a $20 Westfield Gift Card offered to each participant as an ‘interview thank you’ gift.

Please, contact me via email: shayan.zarakhsh@pg.canterbury.ac.nz or Telephone: 033694082 or if you want to see the information sheet for this study.

Ngāi Tahu Research Centre Scholarships

Ngāi Tahu Research Centre, University of Canterbury postgraduate and doctoral scholarships

Three NTRC scholarships are offered annually to Doctoral students which are worth $21,000, plus fees, for three years.

The NTRC also offers five scholarships annually for Postgraduate Diploma, Honours and Master’s students. These scholarships are valued at $12,000 plus fees, for one year.

Scholarship recipients may be studying any discipline at the University of Canterbury, but preference will be given to applicants whose projects promote mātauranga Māori within the sciences, commerce, law or engineering and are linked to the mission and current research foci of the Ngāi Tahu Research Centre.

Subject matters of particular interest to the centre are:

  • Environmental sciences
  • Indigenous and tribal economies
  • 19th Century textual translations of rare South Island manuscripts

Applications are currently open and close at 4pm on 31 October.

Ngai Tahu Research Centre Postgraduate Scholarship

Description

This scholarship supports postgraduate diploma, honours, and master’s students at the University of Canterbury whose research is facilitated by the Ngāi Tahu Research Centre. Up to three scholarships are available annually for applicants of Ngāi Tahu descent. A further two scholarships are available annually to all students undertaking studies facilitated by the Ngāi Tahu Research Centre. The scholarship provides financial assistance to a value of $16,000 per 120 points of enrolment for scholarships reserved for those of Ngāi Tahu descent, and to a value of $12,000 per 120 points of enrolment for an open scholarship. The scholarship also covers full tuition fees for the specified programme of study, at the New Zealand domestic rate, and the Student Services Levy for the term of the scholarship.

Ngai Tahu Research Centre Doctoral Scholarship

Description

These scholarships support PhD students whose study is facilitated through the Ngāi Tahu Research Centre at the University of Canterbury. The University will make available up to three scholarships annually. Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu will make available up to two scholarships every third year.

To download a copy of the scholarship regulations and to apply online please visit

https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/ntrc/scholarships/

To enquire please contact the Ngāi Tahu Research Centre Administrator, phone: +64 3 369 5527 or email: ntrc@canterbury.ac.nz

Opportunity for doctoral student, Flanagan Lab – Biological Sciences

An opportunity is available for a doctoral student to work on sexual selection and evolution in pipefish in the School of Biological Sciences.

The student will be fully funded for three years, and will have the opportunity to conduct field, laboratory, and computational research.

My group studies how and why complex traits and behaviours evolve, with a focus on sexually selected traits. We use a number of different methods to address these broad questions: studies of relevant traits and selection on those traits; genomic studies of signatures of selection; and theoretical simulation studies. 

The immediate focus of the lab concerns uncovering the evolutionary processes that have shaped the sexually dimorphic traits in the wide-bodied pipefish, a native species to New Zealand.

This position offers the flexibility for the doctoral student to decide on the direction of their studies within the framework of my research programme.

See here for more information.

Dr Sarah Flanagan, PhD
Lecturer School of Biological Sciences

Enter the draw by 18 June for withdrawn library books

The Director of Learning Resource has agreed for the Library to offer staff (fixed term or continuing) and doctoral students an opportunity to own a copy of these titles.

The titles have become available because the Library holds duplicates, or because they are no longer required for Research and Teaching at UC.

For a chance to own one or more of theses titles, please add your name and contact details to the PDF, tick the titles you would like to own, and then scan and email the information to: collections@libr.canterbury.ac.nz.

Alternatively, you can send a paper copy through internal mail addressed to:|
Alison Whitla
Library Access and Collections (LAC)
Puaka James Hight, rm 519

All requests must be received by Monday 18 June.

From Friday 8 June and from Monday – Friday  thereafter (9am-5pm), the titles will be  available for viewing in the Library Access and Collections workroom (rm 519) in Puaka James Hight.

A draw will be completed by Wednesday 20 June, with all successful applicants then contacted by phone or mail.

Please note that most titles will have library markings, cancel stamps and are well worn.

See the list of books here.

Congratulations Shanee Barraclough

Graduation is a time of celebration around campus for UC’s students – some of whom are also members of staff.

We congratulate Lecturer / Coordinator of Counsellor Education Shanee Barraclough, who is graduating with her PhD (Education), why she chose to embark on study at UC.

Q: What motivated you to embark on this course of study?
I had previously worked as a Psychologist for fifteen years before becoming interested in Counsellor Education at UC.

I initially worked as a Clinical Educator in both the Master of Counselling programme and the Child and Family Psychology programme, before gaining a permanent position as a Lecturer in Counselling.  At the same time I embarked on my PhD, in order to both further contribute to knowledge in the field of counsellor education as well as to obtain the requisite qualification for my position.

Q: Why are you interested in this area of study?
A: Coming into the role of Counsellor Educator I recognised that, while in my professional work as a Psychologist and Counsellor I had developed expertise in therapeutic models of change with clients, a different kind of knowledge base was required for educating counsellors.

In addition, because the taught model of therapeutic change in the Counselling Programme was underpinned by social constructionist principles, I recognised the need for the philosophy of counsellor education to align with this. Thus, I embarked on a PhD to further develop knowledge around identity and education for counsellors-in-training.    

Q: What is your advice for anyone else juggling work and study? 
A: Juggling work, study and family over the previous five years has been a challenge! Having support from both colleagues and family members to enable me to prioritise time to focus on my PhD has been essential.  Deadlines and excellent PhD supervisors have been helpful as has a lot of yoga!

Q: What does it mean to you to graduate?
A:
Graduation is an opportunity to mark and celebrate an important achievement, for myself and with those who have supported me in making this achievement possible. I am especially pleased to be able to have my parents in the audience who worked hard to enable both myself and my brother to be the first to achieve University degrees in our family, as well as to have my daughter there so she too can begin to imagine what might be possible for her.