Tag Archives: policy library

UC’s Online Survey Policy Simplified

Learning Evaluation and Academic Development (LEAD; formerly Academic Services Group) have recently reviewed and revised the University’s survey policy.

The Student Community Online Survey Policy aims to protect against survey fatigue, and minimise overlap of data collected. It also helps to ensure compliance with ethics guidelines and privacy legislation. Additionally, student and survey data remains secure by use of the University’s Qualtrics survey software.

Key updates include:

  • Simplification in procedure
  • The policy applies only to Student Community; staff-based surveys are exempt
  • Significant membership group applies to survey distributions greater than 200 individuals, down from 500
  • The Survey Reference Group has been dissolved and replaced with a simple online screening tool
  • Overall less restriction/bottlenecking for surveying

All parties interested in any student surveying should fill out their intentions in the online screening tool.

Click here for Qualtrics support.

Please contact LEAD at surveys@canterbury.ac.nz with any questions.

New Resources for UCPL document writers

Want to know how to improve your policy drafting  or where to start if you are new to drafting  documents ? Want to know where to find Contact Officer details when you have queries on a  UC Policy Library (UCPL) document?  Read on to find out the answers.

Policy documents held in the UC Policy Library show role titles rather than staff names, as the people in these roles can change frequently.

It can be hard to find contact details for some members of UC staff on the UC web so to make identifying and contacting UCPL Contact Officers easier, their contact information is now accessible via the UC Policy library>

The Policy Unit has also developed a policy drafting style guide for writing documents that  staff can use. 

The recent UC Admin Plus session on drafting documents provided  more detailed instruction on how to write a policy document, this  resource can be used for drafting other types of compliance documents as well.

If you have any queries about writing policy and/or other compliance documents, feel free to contact the Policy Unit at: ucpolicy@canterbury.ac.nz.

Video overview of UC’s Policy on Prevention of Harassment and Bullying

All staff are encouraged to watch this video overview of UC’s Policy on the Prevention of Harassment and Bullying.

UC regards harassment and bullying of any kind involving staff or students, whether on or off campus, as unacceptable.

UC encourages a culture where people speak up when they see or experience harassment or bullying.

The Policy on the Prevention of Harassment and Bullying was updated in 2018 and it applies to all staff and students.
Read it here>

Prevention of Harassment and Bullying Policy

UC’s Harassment Policy has recently been revised and is now called the Prevention of Harassment and Bullying Policy.

UC is committed to providing a harassment-free and bullying-free environment where all people are treated with respect and dignity and can contribute and participate to their full potential.

The UC community is encouraged to familiarise themselves with the revised policy via the UC Policy Library.

Animals on Campus Policy – what you need to know

Following careful consideration of concerns relating to the presence of dogs in UC buildings, a decision was made to establish an Animals on Campus Policy which allows animals on campus if restrained, and restricts access to animals in UC buildings except for exceptional circumstances that have been approved by the Vice-Chancellor.

The starting point for the policy was to consider the health and safety of all staff and students, including phobias and allergies triggered by the close proximity of animals. All staff should have the right to a safe and healthy working environment.

Since the policy was announced, the Vice-Chancellor has received a total of nine requests to allow ten animals into buildings. In two of these occasions, medical evidence was provided explaining the animal concerned supported the wellbeing of a staff member.

The general argument from these requests is that the animal concerned (mainly but not exclusively dogs) has regularly come into UC buildings, in some cases for a number of years, and it would be inconvenient if a past practice was not allowed to continue. The requests assert that these animals have never caused a problem and in some cases, written support has also been provided by colleagues in close proximity to the animal concerned.

No requests have been made for a certified support animal, such as a seeing eye dog, or a dog to support the hearing impaired etc.  

The Vice-Chancellor concluded that a strict interpretation of the policy is the only way to ensure consistent and fair treatment and therefore advised all applicants that they were no longer able to bring their animals into UC buildings.

He did however offer a transition period, strictly for those that had already submitted an exemption request, which will end on 31 December 2018. Staff were strongly encouraged to contact their HR Advisor for other ways UC can provide support with emotional health and wellbeing.

For more, please refer to the Animals on Campus Policy, now available from the Policy Library>

Supporting FAQs:

  1. Why is there a need for this policy?
    To ensure we meet our obligations under the Health and Safety at Work Act and to provide a framework for balancing the needs and wellbeing of all people on campus.
  2. Who is liable if an animal on campus injures a student, staff member, or another animal: is it the animal’s owner, or the University?
    It is possible that SMT members, Council members and the animal’s owner will all be liable.
  3. Are injuries caused by animals on campus (registered or unregistered) covered by ACC?
    Probably, but that’s for ACC to determine on a case by case basis.
  4. Is it possible to make a case to the Vice-Chancellor for a psychological support animal?
    Possibly, although it is determined on a case by case basis. An individual student or staff member’s preferences and needs will be balanced with those of others on campus, the operational business needs and other matters set out in the policy. If the animal is a disability support dog that is certified by one of the organisations listed in the policy then VC approval will not be required.
  5. If it is possible to make a case for a psychological support animal, will a medical certificate from  a GP, counsellor or psychologist suffice?
    It will be determined on a case by case basis. A clear diagnosis is more compelling than a letter of support from a GP, as most pet owners could suggest their animal provides them with psychological support. Other potential methods of supporting a staff member’s wellbeing will also be taken into account.

Paul O’Flaherty
Executive Director of Human Resources | Kaihautū Matua Pūmanawa Tangata