Tag Archives: postgraduate

UC doctoral students win 2018 Postgraduate Science Scholarship

Congratulations to UC doctoral students Jonathan Dash and Trevor Best, who have been named recipients of the Ministry for Primary Industry (MPI)’s Postgraduate Science Scholarship for 2018.

As doctoral students, the total value of their scholarship will be up to $50,000 to support their primary industry research.

For Jonathan this means funding to assist his research on developing automated methods for the detection and monitoring of wilding pines using remotely sensed data.

And for Trevor the money will be used to fund his research on stress in forestry workers.

For more about this year’s scholarship recipients, see the Government’s media release here>

Introductory Data Analysis Workshop Using R

The Statistical Consulting Unit is having another run of its popular `Data Analysis Using R´ workshops.

The workshops are free and primarily directed at postgraduate students and members of staff, who need to improve their data analytic skills.

The next Introductory Data Analysis Workshop will take place on Wed-Thu 18-19 July 2018 (10am-4pm), and will cover fundamental statistical concepts, such as sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, p-values and confidence intervals, as well as introduce linear regression and analysis of variance (ANOVA). No prior knowledge of R is required.

To register or for further information, please write to Daniel Gerhard at daniel.gerhard@canterbury.ac.nz.

New UC Foundation Doctoral Publication Scholarships

These new scholarships aim to encourage doctoral students to publish aspects of their research during their doctorate.

Criteria and guidelines

  • Scholarships are available only to non-College of Engineering doctoral students enrolled at UC. The College of Engineering is introducing its own scheme, and so Engineers will not be covered by this scholarship.
  • The doctoral student must be the first author of the publication.
  • Scholarships will be to the value of $500 per publication.
  • Publications must be published before the student’s Oral Doctoral exam and their institutional address must be UC.
  • The publication must be searchable in SCOPUS (or an approved citation database).
  • A student may receive more than one scholarship.
  • Scholarship applications can be made at any time up to the students Oral examination.
  • Scholarships will be paid directly to the student for their own use.

Application process

  • The doctoral student applies in writing to the Dean of Postgraduate Research (deanpgresearch@canterbury.ac.nz) with proof of acceptance of the publication and its reference in SCOPUS or other appropriate database.

The Senior Supervisor provides written confirmation of the acceptance of the publication and the contributions made by the student.

Do you know a doctoral student who may benefit from this? Encourage them to apply today.

Appointment – Associate Dean of Postgraduate Research

Tēnā koutou,

I am very pleased to advise the recent appointment of Associate Professor Bronwyn Hayward of the School of Languages, Social and Political Sciences as Associate Dean of Postgraduate Research.

This is a 0.2 FTE fractional position to support the Dean, Professor Jon Harding, in the management and administration of Doctoral and Masters thesis students, support their supervisors, assist departmental postgraduate coordinators, and liaise with PVCs,

HODs, HOSs and Directors as necessary.  Much of Bronwyn’s efforts will focus in the PhD admissions process.  Bronwyn’s contributions will be highly important to the ongoing development of our Doctorate students.

Ngā mihi,

Ian Wright
Deputy Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Tuarua

Professorial Lecture Series – 8 March

Celebrating Fresh Thinking: Professorial Lecture Series

Staff and postgraduate students are invited to join me in celebrating the substantive contribution to academia made by Professor Rien Visser and Professor Michael Tarren-Sweeney in the first Professorial Lecture Series for 2018.

Date:               Thursday, 8 March 2018, from 4.30 – 6.00 p.m.
Location:        F3 Forestry Lecture Theatre

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend these lectures, to actively support our new Professors, and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

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PRESENTATION  DETAILS:
 

“The rise of the autonomous machinery; are robots taking over timber harvesting?” – Presented by Professor Rien Visser, School of Forestry

Ever wondered what goes on when our plantation forests are being cut down? It is no longer brute force and grunty chainsaws. A small high-tech revolution is taking place. Without a doubt, forestry plays an important role both in our landscape as well as society. It provides employment for approximately 15,000 mainly rural New Zealanders, protects the environment, and is our third largest export earner. The last decade has seen some great New Zealand-based innovations in harvesting machines and systems. This means we are not just selling logs, but also high-tech equipment and expertise. However, while operating a million dollar high-tech machine in beautiful scenic settings miles away from the big city can be considered a great job, the geographical remoteness of many forests means contractors are struggling to attract or retain suitable employees.

Meanwhile, international competition for forest products requires ever improving efficiency and robotic machinery is a realistic near-future option. They are being developed right now. This presentation provides a visual overview of developments, showcases our UC contribution, but also encourages a robust discussion on the social ramifications of robots ‘taking over the hills’. Do we embrace it, or do we resist?

Unnatural childhoods – growing up in impermanent, statutory care” – Presented by Professor Michael Tarren-Sweeney, School of Health Sciences

Children typically enter statutory care with compromised psychological development, as a result of chronic and severe maltreatment through their early years. In particular, many children enter care with impaired attachment systems, manifesting to others as relational difficulties – that is further compromised by developmental trauma.

This child population is thus uniquely primed for ‘felt insecurity’. Their developmental recovery hinges on them acquiring and maintaining felt security through the experience of unconditional love and care.  And yet, statutory care systems evolved over the past century with another purpose in mind – to provide time-limited care and protection to children, with restoration to their parents being the final goal.

Despite this, increasing numbers of children throughout the developed world effectively grow up in legally impermanent alternative care. Therein lies a dilemma. In this lecture, I describe extraordinary developmental risks faced by children growing up in statutory care, involving complex interaction of child welfare practices, caregiver motivation, the child’s experience of impermanence, and children’s and caregivers’ felt security.

I conclude that the state can only meet its duty of care to these children if it addresses their need for relational permanence.

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Professor Ian Wright
Deputy Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Tuarua