Tag Archives: Professional Development

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UC’s Organisational Culture Transformation – update #3 – Hui Method, Organisational Culture in the news …

Living the four constructive behaviours: How the “Hui Method” supports our desired organisational culture

Thinking of things cultural, this is a shout-out for engagement with the staff professional development opportunity Tangata Tū, Tangata Ora. I refreshed my knowledge last week – along with a group of nineteen engaged academic and general staff from across UC. This reminded me of the inclusive practices that are exemplified in the “Hui Method” (aka The Mihi Method) which is modelled in the programme.

This process developed out of research at the University of Otago contains four key elements:
1. Mihi – initial greeting and engagement
2. Whakawhanaungatanga – making a connection
3. Kaupapa – attending to the main purpose of the encounter and
4. Poroporoaki – concluding the encounter and ensuring clarity about the next steps.

The facilitators Ripeka and Abby encouraged us to consider the use of this method for a number of situations. Examples we discussed included: an inclusive way of teaching in both large and small group settings, use in other student interactions, and how this could positively change the format of meetings. The concept appeared to resonate for all of us there.

Using the Hui Process will reinforce the constructive behaviours described by Human Synergistics – from both the individual and organisational perspective. Mihi and Whakawhanaungatanga create an environment of participation, trust and commitment. In other words the Humanistic-Encouraging and Affiliative behaviours. Focusing on Kaupapa after the building of engagement and connection fosters Achievement characteristics. The articulation and clarification of agreed next steps reinforce that style. The entire process supports Self-Actualisation as this is about personal growth and development, about expanding experiences, and gaining fulfilment from doing a job well.

The Hui Method was developed in an educational health setting and seems to me to be a helpful way to support our bicultural aspirations, while helping us to model the operational culture we have described as desirable. See the Tangata tū, tangata ora website to register.

“The current consensus from Māori health leaders, student feedback and anecdotal Māori patient feedback indicates the ‘Hui Process’ is easily learnt, well received by patients and can enhance the doctor–patient relationship”.

Lacey, Cameron & Huria, Tania & Beckert, Lutz & Gilles, Matea & Pitama, Suzanne. (2011). The Hui Process: A framework to enhance the doctor-patient relationship with Māori. The New Zealand medical journal. 124. 72-8.

If you are an academic staff member and you want to further reflect on your own practice, make connections and identify potential opportunities to embed culturally responsive pedagogy see Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: From Theory to Practice.

Feature Articles – organisational culture in the news
I’ve been seeing and hearing a lot about Organisational Culture in the news (and I don’t believe it is just frequency illusion!) People seem to be more aware of the impact of workplace culture on their practices, services, staff wellbeing and organisational success. Below are some examples. I am keen for some that show impact from a more positive aspect – send me any you find.

1. Should we steer clear of the winner-takes-all approach? Researchers reflect on an initiative in New Zealand to make science more inclusive. (Nature, International Journal of Science)

“At a time of great global divisiveness, moves are afoot to make the research culture more welcoming, respectful and responsible …. The winner-takes-all model is not the only way to make big breakthroughs in research ….”.

2. Interview with Deloitte’s forensic director Lorinda Kelly (audio): “New Zealand least corrupt in the world” (Radio NZ The Panel)

“… sub-culture … it was OK to be doing the things they were doing and it was the way everybody was behaving in that small group … corrupt culture that enabled the behaviour to carry on…”

3. “EQC culture change is long overdue” (Stuff editorial)

“….EQC seemed increasingly like a throwback to the bad old days of tight-lipped, defensive organisations that did not always seem to have local interests at heart”.

Finding Out More
– See UC’s Culture Journey website for more information on the UC programme, tools, articles and whitepapers, FAQs and more.
– Share your good news stories about culture change. Snippet of news? Use the short format. More reflective story to tell? Use the slightly longer format (suitable for Culture Leaders).
– Previous blog – Blog #2.

Ngā mihi nui
Karen Mather
Organisational Development Manager

Professorial Lecture Series – 8 March

Celebrating Fresh Thinking: Professorial Lecture Series

Staff and postgraduate students are invited to join me in celebrating the substantive contribution to academia made by Professor Rien Visser and Professor Michael Tarren-Sweeney in the first Professorial Lecture Series for 2018.

Date:               Thursday, 8 March 2018, from 4.30 – 6.00 p.m.
Location:        F3 Forestry Lecture Theatre

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend these lectures, to actively support our new Professors, and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.


“The rise of the autonomous machinery; are robots taking over timber harvesting?” – Presented by Professor Rien Visser, School of Forestry

Ever wondered what goes on when our plantation forests are being cut down? It is no longer brute force and grunty chainsaws. A small high-tech revolution is taking place. Without a doubt, forestry plays an important role both in our landscape as well as society. It provides employment for approximately 15,000 mainly rural New Zealanders, protects the environment, and is our third largest export earner. The last decade has seen some great New Zealand-based innovations in harvesting machines and systems. This means we are not just selling logs, but also high-tech equipment and expertise. However, while operating a million dollar high-tech machine in beautiful scenic settings miles away from the big city can be considered a great job, the geographical remoteness of many forests means contractors are struggling to attract or retain suitable employees.

Meanwhile, international competition for forest products requires ever improving efficiency and robotic machinery is a realistic near-future option. They are being developed right now. This presentation provides a visual overview of developments, showcases our UC contribution, but also encourages a robust discussion on the social ramifications of robots ‘taking over the hills’. Do we embrace it, or do we resist?

Unnatural childhoods – growing up in impermanent, statutory care” – Presented by Professor Michael Tarren-Sweeney, School of Health Sciences

Children typically enter statutory care with compromised psychological development, as a result of chronic and severe maltreatment through their early years. In particular, many children enter care with impaired attachment systems, manifesting to others as relational difficulties – that is further compromised by developmental trauma.

This child population is thus uniquely primed for ‘felt insecurity’. Their developmental recovery hinges on them acquiring and maintaining felt security through the experience of unconditional love and care.  And yet, statutory care systems evolved over the past century with another purpose in mind – to provide time-limited care and protection to children, with restoration to their parents being the final goal.

Despite this, increasing numbers of children throughout the developed world effectively grow up in legally impermanent alternative care. Therein lies a dilemma. In this lecture, I describe extraordinary developmental risks faced by children growing up in statutory care, involving complex interaction of child welfare practices, caregiver motivation, the child’s experience of impermanence, and children’s and caregivers’ felt security.

I conclude that the state can only meet its duty of care to these children if it addresses their need for relational permanence.


Professor Ian Wright
Deputy Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Tuarua

2018 L&D courses are now live

The courses/workshops and programmes that make up the Learning and Development offerings are now available for registration.

The first courses for the year (with spaces still available) are:
Tangata Tū, Tangata Ora
Tues 6 & Thurs 8 March, 9am-4.30pm
Te Reo Māori for the Workplace (2 modules)
Weds 14 March & Weds 11 April, 1-4.30pm
Growing Personal Resilience
Tues 10 April, 9am-4.30pm
Supporting Students in Crisis: Tools, Triage and Referral
Module One on Weds 18 April, 9am-3pm
Modules 2 & 3 on Thurs 19 April, 9am-12.30pm & 1pm-4.30pm
Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: From Theory to Practice
Mon 23 April, 1-4.30pm
Pasifika Talanoa Professional Development Day
Fri 27 April, 9.30-4.30pm

Start planning your year, book time for your Professional
Development, and register now while there are still spaces available.

To find out more of what is on offer, visit our Learning and Development intranet site here.
For a full list of our programmes, go to our A-Z here.

Te Reo Māori for the Workplace

Dates & registrations for 2018 Te Reo Māori courses are available.

We have limited spaces available for
Wednesday 14 March (Module 1) &
Wednesday 11 April (Module 2)
Both modules are half day courses and run from 1.00-4.30pm

For more information and to register, visit our Learning and
Development, Te Reo for the Workplace site here.

All Learning and Development courses for 2018 are now live and available for registration (with one or two exceptions).
Visit our intranet site, or email learningdevelopment@canterbury.ac.nz for more information.