Tag Archives: Professorial Lecture Series

CELEBRATE FRESH THINKING: PROFESSORIAL LECTURE SERIES

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution to academia made by Professor Janet Carter and Professor Pedro Lee as part of the Professorial Lecture Series in 2018.

  • Date: Thursday 15 November, from 4.30 – 6pm
  • Location: E14 – Engineering Core

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend this lecture series to actively support our new Professors, and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university you may be less familiar with. You’ll find further information on each presentation, below.

Ngā mihi

Professor Ian Wright
Deputy Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Tuarua

 

Presentation details:

Psychotherapy for depression; what works?
Presented by Professor Janet Carter, Department of Psychology and Dean of Science

Depression is a leading cause of disability and disease burden in society and has a huge impact on the quality of life and functioning of individuals affected. It is well established that psychotherapies are effective in the treatment of depression. Although therapy is effective there is much room for improvement.

Many people with depression only partially respond to treatment and relapse rates for depression are high. Several studies comparing different types of psychotherapy have also shown there are no or only minimal differences in the effectiveness of different therapies.  Currently we know very little about which type of therapy is likely to be the most effective for a particular individual and we have limited understanding about which elements of therapy are fundamental to a response. 

These questions have and continue to be the drivers of my work as an academic clinical psychologist. Understanding how we might better tailor therapy to an individual is a significant challenge, however, it is also one of the major ways we can improve mental health outcomes. 

In this Professorial lecture I will summarise my research findings examining predictors of response to psychotherapy in adults with depression and also highlight some of the common elements of therapy that are thought to contribute to a positive outcome.

 

Can pipelines be used for communication?
Presented by Professor Pedro Lee, Department of Civil and Natural Resources Engineering

For decades, civil pipeline engineers have been focused on the destructive properties of surge events in their system and have dedicated their efforts into suppressing these pressure waves. In electrical systems, similar destructive surge events occur but electrical engineers have long realised that small, customised surge waves can be used to transmit coded information across large distances. This idea forms the basis for communication through conductors and is central to many technologies we see around us today.

On a fundamental level, pressure surges in water pipes are nearly identical to voltage surges in electrical systems. We can take inspiration from established technologies in the electrical field to evolve our extensive water supply networks so that they are capable of transmitting and receiving information through the water within the pipe. Our essential water infrastructure can be more than just buried tubes for transporting water. 

This presentation will cover the development of this idea and the technical challenges with creating coded, high controlled pressure pulse sequences in pressurised pipelines. The results of an international pilot testing programme of a pipe condition assessment technology will be presented as a case study to demonstrate the real-world potential of this field of research.

Celebrate Fresh Thinking: Professorial Lecture Series

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution to academe made by Professor Annick Masselot and Professor Lynne Taylor as part of the Professorial Lecture Series in 2018.

  • Date:               Thursday, 25 October 2018, from 4.30 – 6.00 p.m.
  • Location:        F3 – Forestry

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend this lecture, to actively support our new Professors, and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

Presentation details:

“Raising pigs and children: Comparative approaches to work-life balance policies”
Presented by Professor Annick Masselot, School of Law

Rising female employment rate, fluid family formation and falling fertility rates are amongst factors contributing to work-family conflicts. In the quest for work and family reconciliation, many post-industrial societies continue to face a plethora of challenges linked to the tensions between the demands of capitalist employment and the requirement for care.

Countries have adopted different approaches to develop work-life balance policies.  For example, work-family reconciliation is a fully-fledged principle of the EU gender equality framework. New Zealand’s approach to work-life balance by contrast claims to neither be about women, nor about families. In Singapore, effort related to work-life balance are about raising fertility rates. Regardless of the approach chosen, the results are similar: There are large gaps between the letter of the law and its practice. Pregnant women and new parents (especially mothers) continue to experience high levels of systemic discrimination based on prejudice and the exclusion of reproduction from costs/benefits in traditional accounting.

How can we move forwards? What strategies could be put forward to value productive and reproductive activities more equally in our societies?

 

“The duties of directors of insolvent companies: A case study”
Presented by Professor Lynne Taylor, School of Law

Our law as to bankruptcy is archaic, antiquated, abstruse. I have always shied absolutely clear of it, and I think that most lawyers have, too… You [only] have to look at the statute; and then you do not understand it.” Lord Denning, perhaps the most famous common law judge of the twentieth century, uttered these words in 1985. Yet, despite the antipathy expressed by Lord Denning and others, bankruptcy (or insolvency) law is something that touches us all. Very few of us are likely to avoid being a creditor of an insolvent company. Even if we are so fortunate, we will almost certainly be indirectly and adversely affected by the flow-on effects of company failures, large and small, on the wider community.

Unlike Lord Denning, the presenter has not flinched from exploring the mysteries of insolvency law. Drawing on 20 years of research in this area, she offers her view on the adequacy of New Zealand’s company insolvency framework using the duties of directors of insolvent companies as a case study.

Professor Ian Wright
Deputy Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Tuarua

CELEBRATE FRESH THINKING: PROFESSORIAL LECTURE SERIES

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution to academe made by Professor Linda Jean Kenix as part of the Professorial Lecture Series in 2018.

  • Date:               Thursday, 11 October 2018, from 4:30 – 5:30 p.m.
  • Location:        A5 Lecture Theatre, Arts

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend this lecture, to actively support our new Professors, and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

Presentation details:

“’Alternative’ Media: Does That Mean Anything Now and What’s Next? The Power of Framing and Ideology”
Presented by Professor Linda Jean Kenix, School of Language, Social & Political Science

Alternative media, which have historically existed in explicit opposition to the mainstream, are now difficult to discern in an increasingly crowded media market with no obvious boundaries in ideology, ownership or journalistic intention. The previous, mainly dichotomous, media landscape is now a collective institution, which is made up of largely hyper-partisan perspectives.

This presentation explores two decades of personal research that has examined this shift in an environment that generally views the collective press as an untrustworthy entity that is at war with competing institutions. This presentation argues that this war is principally about objectivity, which is much better understood in the context of media frames, and is largely lost in the current hyper-partisan mediated landscape. Through a review of personal research, this presentation suggests that the power of those media frames sits in the explicitly embedded but latent sociological, political, and cultural forces that surround contemporary society.

Media frames have come to define the ideologies at war and yet the public craves the reinforcement of these ideologies in their media consumption. This circuitous process has led to an echoing of information across the mediated landscape. This presentation ends with precautions and suggestions for the future of media.

Professor Ian Wright
Deputy Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Tuarua

Celebrate Fresh Thinking: Professorial Lecture Series

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution to academia made by Professor Katharina Naswall and Professor Philip Armstrong as part of the Professorial Lecture Series in 2018

  • Date: Thursday 4 October 2018 from 4:30 – 6:00pm
  • Location: F3 Forestry

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend this lecture, to actively support our new Professors and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the University we may be less familiar with.

Presentation details:

‘Shakespeare’s Animal Parts’
Presented by Professor Philip Armstrong, School of Humanities & Creative Arts

“There are lots of animals in Shakespeare: over 4,000 references to animals are scattered through the plays and poems, representing hundreds of different species. Yet scholars are uncertain about whether any actual animals ever appeared on Shakespeare’s stage in the Globe theatre. My talk will address both of these issues. I’ll survey some of the surprising things that Shakespeare’s animals tell us about his art and the world in which he lived, and I’ll also speculate on what kinds of animals might actually have appeared as ‘actors’ in the play’s original performances. My aim is to show that by paying attention to animals, we gain an extra appreciation of the richness and diversity both of Shakespeare’s world and of our own.”

‘Could the time you spend at work be good for your health and wellbeing?”
Presented by Professor Katharina Naswall, Department of Psychology

Work takes up a large part of life for many, and tends to affect how we feel. Technology has enabled greater flexibility to fit work to life outside work, but technology has also made it more difficult to switch off from work. If work provided a source of positive influence and supporting health and wellbeing, work has the potential to improve lives well outside the scope of the regular working day – work can become part of the solution to improving health and wellbeing in New Zealand. My research focuses on how work can become a positive influence in people’s lives, and creating a work environment which is inclusive of different cultures and values. This is done building on knowledge gathered from New Zealand organisations, and work on building a framework for organisations to support employees to better health and wellbeing. In my vision, workplaces are part of the solution for improving societal health and wellbeing. In my talk, I outline a few of the lines of research I have been pursuing to work towards this vision, and a few ideas for future research.

Professor Ian Wright
Deputy Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Tuarua