Tag Archives: Research & Innovation

ERSKINE PROGRAMME GRANT PROFILE – ANNICK MASSELOT

A
Annick Masselot in Cambridge

What Department/School have you come from and what do you teach?
I come from the School of Law. I teach Employment Law and Advanced Employment Law, Contract Law, Gender and the Law, European Union Law and Legal Research Methods.  I also do some teaching in the Executive Development Programme where I teach Business Law for the MBA and the MBM degrees.

What interested you in the Grant opportunity?
One of my present line of research is concerned with the gender impact of Brexit. People wrongly think that Brexit and, what are considered to be the most relevant issues: Trade and migration, are gender neutral topics.  In reality, the most adversely impacted people are likely to be the least visible people: women and people from minority backgrounds.

The Cambridge Grant provided me with the opportunity to be based and do research in the United Kingdom at a time when political and legal developments around this theme were at their peak. The Grant further offered me the opportunity to be at Cambridge University where I could interact with experts in the field of constitutional and European Union law and political as well as gender studies scholars. As Cambridge is central to the UK, I knew I was also going to be able to do research in London, in particular at the British Parliament. I was also able to work with NGO and think tanks.

Being in the UK also provided a chance for me to disseminate my work in the country and also in other European Countries.

The grant is generous enough that I was able to do research without  worrying about where to live and I could take my family with me, which was a real bonus.

Where did you visit (i.e which institutions)?
I was a recipient of the Cambridge Grant so I spent most of my time at Cambridge University, where I was based in the Centre for European Legal Studies in the Faculty of Law.  During my time at Cambridge, I was also invited to deliver talks in other institutions.

  • ‘Gendertrouble while approaching the cliff edge Brexit?’ Queen’s University Belfast, The Centre for European and Transnational Studies, Belfast, 7 October 2019
  • ‘Jacinda Ardern and the development of a model of feminist foreign policy?’ feminist foreign policy in the EU context, Quaker Council for European Affairs, Brussels, 26 September 2019
  • ‘The gender impact of Brexit – Unpacking the ideology of socio-political institutions’, School of Law, Reading University, 16 October 2019 (with Roberta Guerrina UoBristol).

How will your time overseas benefit your teaching at UC?
The Cambridge Grant is mostly a research grant, as such it does not really consider teaching. However, I was also invited as a guest lecturer in the Jean Monnet Summer School on Gender and Brexit: Processes and Strategies for Gender Mainstreaming in the Process of Exiting the EU, University of Surrey (UK), 3-8 July 2019.

I delivered two lectures to a range of students and practitioners on (1) EU as a Gender Actor from Internal to External Affairs and (2) Gendering External Affairs – How is Trade gendered?

This experience together with the ability to share experience on European Union practices and on Brexit with practitioners provides unique experience which can be translated into vivid lectures at the University of Canterbury. Having first hand expertise in a topic makes us better teacher because we know what is going on on the ground.  

 Do you have any advice for potential future Grant applicants?
Don’t be shy, go forth and meet people outside UC.

 

Citation advantage for open access at UC

The scholarly publishing market is changing rapidly. The UC Library and R&I has been assessing the potential impact of developments such as Plan S on UC researchers to identify how we can prepare to meet them.

We investigated the rate of citation for articles produced by UC researchers and founding an overall citation advantage for research in open access publications. Specifically, we found that articles deposited in the UC Research Repository were cited 129% more often, on average, than articles only available behind a paywall (a.k.a. ‘closed access’).

Getting your work into the UC Research Repository is straight-forward:

  1. In Elements, upload the manuscript accepted by the publisher (and any other versions that you have).
  2. Select “Accepted version” and click deposit.

UC Library staff will double-check copyright compliance before uploading the correct version into the UC Research Repository. If you have questions or would like support with this process, get in touch with your subject librarian.

Making your work open access doesn’t have to involve costly article processing charges. Publish anywhere, deposit here.

Ngāi Tahu Research Centre Scholarships

Ngāi Tahu Research Centre, University of Canterbury postgraduate and doctoral scholarships

Three NTRC scholarships are offered annually to Doctoral students which are worth $21,000, plus fees, for three years.

The NTRC also offers five scholarships annually for Postgraduate Diploma, Honours and Master’s students. These scholarships are valued at $12,000 plus fees, for one year.

Scholarship recipients may be studying any discipline at the University of Canterbury, but preference will be given to applicants whose projects promote mātauranga Māori within the sciences, commerce, law or engineering and are linked to the mission and current research foci of the Ngāi Tahu Research Centre.

Subject matters of particular interest to the centre are:

  • Environmental sciences
  • Indigenous and tribal economies
  • 19th Century textual translations of rare South Island manuscripts

Applications are currently open and close at 4pm on 31 October.

Ngai Tahu Research Centre Postgraduate Scholarship

Description

This scholarship supports postgraduate diploma, honours, and master’s students at the University of Canterbury whose research is facilitated by the Ngāi Tahu Research Centre. Up to three scholarships are available annually for applicants of Ngāi Tahu descent. A further two scholarships are available annually to all students undertaking studies facilitated by the Ngāi Tahu Research Centre. The scholarship provides financial assistance to a value of $16,000 per 120 points of enrolment for scholarships reserved for those of Ngāi Tahu descent, and to a value of $12,000 per 120 points of enrolment for an open scholarship. The scholarship also covers full tuition fees for the specified programme of study, at the New Zealand domestic rate, and the Student Services Levy for the term of the scholarship.

Ngai Tahu Research Centre Doctoral Scholarship

Description

These scholarships support PhD students whose study is facilitated through the Ngāi Tahu Research Centre at the University of Canterbury. The University will make available up to three scholarships annually. Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu will make available up to two scholarships every third year.

To download a copy of the scholarship regulations and to apply online please visit

https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/ntrc/scholarships/

To enquire please contact the Ngāi Tahu Research Centre Administrator, phone: +64 3 369 5527 or email: ntrc@canterbury.ac.nz

Come and support our colleague: Professorial Lecture Series

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution made by Professor Clemency Montelle and Professor Geoffrey Rodgers in the next presentation in the Professorial Lecture Series for 2019.

Date                Thursday 3 October, from 4.30 – 6.00pm

Venue             E14 – Engineering Core

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend these lectures, to actively support our new professors, and to take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

Extraordinary scientific exchanges between Europe and India in the 18th century

Presented by Professor Clemency Montelle

International collaboration makes for fruitful innovation, and historical studies show this isn’t just a modern phenomenon.  In November 1730, a young Portuguese astronomer named Pedro Da Silva travelled to India, bringing with him a copy of the 1727 reprint of Philippe de La Hire’s Tabulae astronomicae. Working in the court of Jayasiṃha, Emperor of Jaipur, in the subsequent years, da Silva and other Jesuit priests collaborated alongside Indian astronomers to produce versions of this work in Sanskrit.   I explore this fascinating case of transmission by comparing passages from the 1727 reprint in Latin and the subsequent Sanskrit translations and some of the surprising consequences of introducing new science to a contrasting culture of inquiry.

Research into earthquake engineering and hip replacement implants

Presented by Professor Geoffrey Rodgers

This talk will cover the closely related, yet seemingly disparate fields of earthquake engineering and biomedical engineering. Perhaps surprisingly, the finer details of research in both these fields can require a closely similar skill-set, despite the vastly different fields of application.

This talk will first cover recent research into novel energy dissipation and seismic damping devices, and their application to low-damage structures to improve the resilience of built environment. Implementation of these new structural design methods and devices, both locally within the Christchurch Rebuild, and internationally, will be covered.

This talk will also cover the use of ultrasonic sensors, video motion capture, and human gait analysis, to better understand the mechanics of hip replacement implants within the human body. This increased understanding of the in-service implant mechanics will help to design additional methods to diagnose impending Dysfunction of Osteo-Mechanics (DOOM) and potentially improve hip replacement implant designs.

I look forward to seeing you there.

Professor Ian Wright, Deputy Vice-Chancellor

Intelligent Automation: 1st RPA Brown Bag Lunch, 12pm –  1pm Wednesday 11th September 2019 at Puaka James Hight 210

UC has started a programme of work to assess and implement intelligent automation opportunities across the university and form a Centre of Excellence in process automation. The aim of this programme is to utilise intelligent automation to provide improved service to students, clients, suppliers and staff and provide staff with more time to complete unfinished tasks, solve complex problems, and perform additional tasks.  UC currently has two automated processes live and running, with a further three in development.

The aim of this session is to cover the following four topics:

  • What is Intelligent Automation, and where does Robotic Process Automation (“RPA”) sit on the spectrum between rules-based and adaptive thinking.
  • What is UC currently doing in Robotic Process Automation, including case studies and end-user experiences.
  • Could RPA be a potential solution for a current pain point you experience that is effecting your ability to complete your required tasks, or provide the required level of service to UC’s students, clients and staff.
  • What are the required skillsets for working with intelligent automation, and how can I  upskill myself.

If you have any questions, please get in touch with the team at intelligentautomation@canterbury.ac.nz.

We will re-run a similar session 12pm – 1pm  on Friday 27 September at Puaka James Hight 210 for those who are unable to make the first session.