Tag Archives: research

There is a Staff Intranet Specifically For You

Did you know there is a staff intranet for you, depending on your type of role? Have a look at it, because there are a lot of links that you will probably find useful.

Open the UC Intranet Home page, look in the top left corner, and go from there.

To find the UC Intranet Home page:
1. Go to https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/
2. Scroll down to the bottom right corner (tap the End key on your keyboard to go straight there)
3. Click Intranet (Staff)

The Technology Information for Staff website also has links to the information that you are likely to need regularly at the University of Canterbury.


For great time-saving tips, look up our Archive of Tech Tips or look through the Technology Information for Staff website.

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

The Jumpstart 2018 winners have been announced

An innovative biological treatment to overcome antibiotic resistance, a pioneering technique to create environmentally friendly, near-zero waste processes in the galvanising industry, and a diagnostic test to save mother and baby from life-threatening pre-eclampsia are among the winners in this year’s University of Canterbury (UC) Innovation Jumpstart competition.

Five prizes of $20,000 were awarded funding from KiwiNet. Additionally, technology incubators WNT Ventures and Astrolab chose two projects to receive $35,000 worth of practical services.

Innovation Jumpstart gives UC researchers from all disciplines, including arts, science, education, engineering, business and law, the opportunity to transform their ideas and research into commercial reality.

The Jumpstart competition is in its ninth year with researchers from across the university encouraged to consider how their ideas and research may hold the potential to transform into a commercial reality.

The competition was judged by a panel of entrepreneurs and industry leaders, including representatives from Callaghan Innovation, technology incubators WNT Ventures and Astrolab, UC alumni and staff.

The judges included award-winning entrepreneur and UC alumnus Dennis Chapman, entrepreneur Paul Davis, Ara Deputy Chair Elizabeth Hopkins, tech investor Greg Sitters who is a Managing Partner of Matū, a venture fund specialising in early stage science and technology startups. 

Innovation Jumpstart winners:

WNT Ventures prize:

Recovery of feedstock chemicals from dilute solution

Dr Matthew Cowan (Chemical and Process Engineering)

A novel technology for recovering unused materials from machine or industrial processes. Dr Matthew Cowan proposes creating a technology which will make producing speciality plastics and chemicals more efficient and create less waste. The recycling of waste products from these chemical reactions will create economic benefits for an international market with potential for engineering and operational jobs.

Astrolab prize:

Enzymes for controlling Gram-negative pathogenic microbes in food, medicine, and veterinary industries

Associate Professor Renwick Dobson (Biomolecular Interactions Centre, School of Biological Sciences), doctoral candidate Michael Love and Dr Craig Billington (ESR)

Innovative resistance-proof bacteria-killing enzymes that are safe to treat both humans and animals. This treatment will save lives, reduce healthcare costs and be an alternative to antibiotics as a safer and cheaper option. The application of this research will have many implications across multiple industries, creating new treatment options for infections in the medical industry, becoming a low-cost solution to untreatable on-farm bacterial disease, and being a biosecurity treatment for cross-contamination for food that is vulnerable to microbial pathogens.

New diagnostic test for life-threatening condition in pregnancy for mother and child

Dr Jennifer Crowther (Biomolecular Interactions Centre, School of Biological Sciences), Professor Mark Hampton (University of Otago), Dr Neil Pattinson (ChristchurchNZ), Associate Professor Renwick Dobson

Pre-eclampsia is a life-threatening condition for both mother and child that occurs in around 5% of all pregnancies. This diagnostic test uses a biomarker of patients presenting with altered levels of a particular protein to diagnose early in order to closely monitor symptoms and prolong the duration of the pregnancy. This illness currently has no consistent predictive testing method to identify the presence of the illness at an early-stage.

Innovative spin coating to create environmentally friendly materials

Associate Professor Mathieu Sellier (Mechanical Engineering), Dr Volker Nock and Associate Professor Shayne Gooch

A pioneering technology using a new multi-axis spin to coat items in the micro-electronics and optic industry. Associate Professor Sellier proposes a reliable and easy to use process to thin coating of curved surfaces with thin filament creating consistent results every time. This unique technology could disrupt multiple industries.

An eco-friendly solution to reuse acid waste from galvanising plants

Dr Aaron Marshall (Chemical and Process Engineering)

This innovative method recycles iron and zinc from the process of galvanising steel to protect it from corrosion, in order to save resources and recycle waste. Developed from an industry problem, this tech promises to save the industry by up to 70% of its pre-galvanising cleaning costs which could save companies hundreds of thousands each year.

Innovation Jumpstart momentum builds as all colleges jump in

At a time when the Innovation Jumpstart Competition is branching out into exciting new territory, UC Research & Innovation were thrilled to received 20 entries the second highest number of entries in six years of running the competition. 

This comes at a time when the competition branches out into brave new territory.  Formerly Tech Jumpstart, the new name refocuses the concept of innovation across all of UC’s disciplines and colleges.

Applications came from every college 

ENGINEERING                          11  = 55%

SCIENCE                                         6 = 30%

ARTS                                                  1 = 5%

BUSINESS and LAW                  1 = 5%

EDUCATION, HEALTH
and
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT    1 = 5%                                                                                                          

Digging deeper:

  • 10 submissions (50%) were from individual researchers
  • 10 submissions (50%) were contributed by two or more researchers as a team
  • 36 academic staff in total
  • 7 staff (19%) had submitted in the previous 2017 Tech Jumpstart Competition
  • 29 staff (81%) were submitting for the first time.

What’s next?

Shortlisting is happening Tuesday  21 August by a group of external and internal judges followed by the top entries presenting their proposals on Thursday 13 September.

The top five projects will receive $20,000 funding each to help with innovation and technology development, as well as commercialisation support from Research & Innovation (R&I) and possible access to additional funding sources for continued development.

Awards ceremony – reminder that the Innovation Jumpstart Competition 2018 Awards Ceremony will be held on 3 October, 6:00pm – 7:30pm in the UC Council Chambers, Matariki Building.
Applicants and others interested are invited to attend. RSVP information will be provided closer to the time.

Thesis-in-three champ shares joys and challenges of competition

How do you distill the complexities of your postgraduate research into one slide in just three minutes, and in a way that will interest strangers?

It’s s not for the fainthearted  –  but that’s what the three winners of UC’s Thesis-in-Three finals did this week.

Congratulations to:

  • Best Doctoral student presentation – Samantha Bodman (Physical and Chemical Sciences)
  • Best Masters student presentation – Chris Boniface (Law)
  • Third place winner – Kseniia Zahrai (Management, Marketing & Entrepreneurship)

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Chris Boniface shares some insight into the competition  and responds to the UC Comms Team’s own challenge: describe your research in one paragraph, 30 words.

The Effects of Artificial Intelligence on the New Zealand Healthcare System  – Chris Boniface

Why did you enter Chris?  – As a whole, I’m not a fan of, or at all experienced in public speaking or presenting but I want to pursue postgrad to its limits, including seminars, conferences, publications and more to get the career I want. Thesis in Three offered the opportunity to practice those skills in a fun, competitive environment. 

What proved challenging? – Trying to fit my research into only three minutes, in a clear and succinct way. My speech only really covered one of four major aspects of my research, because if I tried to include everything it would be a rushed mess, and I had to make sure a part was engaging and interesting, but still concise! 

One paragraph, 30 words. Can you do it? –  When you’re in a vulnerable healthcare situation, knowing things are ready to help you when they go wrong is vital – the robots are coming, we need to be prepared!

Photo:  Chris is congratulated by Deputy Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Tuarua Ian Wright. 

Dr Ronán Feehily wins UC Business School Early Career Researcher Award

The 2018 recipient of the UC Business School Early Career Researcher Award is Dr Ronán Feehily, senior lecturer in the Department of Accounting and Information Systems.

Ronán has worked as an academic on three continents, and his research profile reflects the global reach of his publications.

His research interests lie primarily in the field of international commercial dispute resolution. Additional research interests include corporate governance, international trade and legal education.

He is the author of 17 peer reviewed journal articles in leading journals in the USA, UK and South Africa (including 7 A, 2 B, and 6 C ranked publications).

He has also edited a book and co-authored a new edition of An Introduction to the Law of Contract in New Zealand. He has delivered nine conference papers at leading conferences in the UK and Africa covering various aspects of his research interests.

While his publications have been cited on numerous occasions by various authors, there are two references that are particularly noteworthy. The United Nations Commission on International Trade Law Regional Head for Asia and the Pacific, cited the article ‘Confidentiality and Transparency in International Commercial Arbitration: Finding the Right Balance’, published in the Harvard Negotiation Law Review (Volume 22, Spring 2017, 275-323), as a major contribution to the advancement of rule-based commerce and to the promotion of multilateral trade and investment laws.

The proposals for regulatory and law reform contained in the article dealing with costs sanctions published in the South African Law Journal in 2009, were cited by Prof Alan Rycroft, who mentioned in particular that Dr Feehily’s prediction was accurate that commercial mediation would not become a prominent form of dispute resolution in South Africa until heavy costs penalties are deployed by the courts (see Alan Rycroft ‘What should the consequences be of an unreasonable refusal to participate in ADR?’ (2014) 131 South African Law Journal 778).

Ronán’s research has also contributed to proposals for law reform in Ireland, and his proposals were incorporated by the Irish Law Reform Commission in their report ‘Alternative Dispute Resolution: Mediation and Conciliation’.

The report ultimately led to the enactment of the Mediation Act 2017, introducing a legal framework for the use of mediation in civil and commercial disputes in Ireland.

He is currently involved in an interdisciplinary project with Julia Wu, an ACIS lecturer in accounting, involving an investigation into institutional investors/shareholders and their experience with audit committees, and the impact it has on corporate governance in New Zealand.

The project has received Business School funding and will result in an article in a highly ranked peer-reviewed corporate governance journal and at least one conference paper.

Please join us in congratulating Ronán on this well-deserved recognition of his research success.