Tag Archives: research

Celebrating Fresh Thinking: Professorial Lecture Series

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution to academe made by Professor Pavel Castka and Professor Tom Cochrane in the next presentation in the Professorial Lecture Series for 2019.

Date:               Thursday, 6 June, from 4.30 – 6.00 p.m.

Location:        E14 – Engineering Core

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend this lecture, to actively support our new Professors, and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

Presentation details:

 “Universal Language of the Future? Addressing business challenges through international standards” – Presented by Professor Pavel Castka, Department of Management, Marketing & Entrepreneurship

 How can businesses address social and environmental issues – such as climate change, social responsibility, poverty or child labour – in a vastly diverse world with different opinions on these issues?  Is there a common platform or universal language that can facilitate the interaction between businesses across the world – enabling addressing of these challenges as well as challenges of everyday cooperation of firms in global supply chains?

In this inaugural professorial lecture, I will build on research at UC as well as my involvement with international standard setting NGOs – including International Organisation for Standardization (ISO) and International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) – and discuss the status quo as well as future challenges of standards setting, adoption and control mechanisms that ensure consistency of international standards across the globe. The lecture is designed for a diverse audience that is interested in social and environmental issues as well as in the generic matters of cooperation in international business – inclusive of non-academic audience such as business leaders or social activists. The lecture provides an insight into the exciting world of international standards, potentially the universal language of the future.

 

Food–energy–water nexus in the Mekong” – Presented by Professor Tom Cochrane, Department of Civil & Natural Resources Engineering

 The Mekong basin in Southeast Asia is undergoing rapid development.  Basin wide water infrastructure development (hydropower/irrigation), climate change and land-use change are causes for concern due to potential impacts on highly valued fisheries, agriculture, and natural ecosystems. Extensive water, sediment and nutrient modelling and analyses were thus conducted to understand the food-energy-water nexus in the basin and assess future threats and evaluate alternative pathways. Results show that recent development of flood protection dykes, as well as sea level rise and land subsidence pose a major threat to the long term sustainability of the Mekong Delta. Future adaptation and mitigation strategies should include optimal operation of water infrastructure (hydropower, dykes, and irrigation systems) to reduce hydrological and sediment changes, reduction in groundwater pumping, water storage management, sea level rise protection infrastructure, land reclamation, enhancement of coastal and in-stream habitats, and others.  A single solution is not sufficient for this complex basin; multiple mitigation initiatives are necessary through transboundary communication and coordination. The analysis and methods, as well as the lessons learnt in this research can be translated to other river systems around the world undergoing rapid development and climatic threats.

Professor Ian Wright

Deputy Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Tuarua

UC shines in PBRF results

On Tuesday, the Tertiary Education Commission released the 2018 Performance-based Research Fund (PBRF) results.

The results are an assessment of research over the past six years, and were an excellent indication of how the University has performed – and thrived – since the Waitaha Canterbury earthquakes.

The results reinforce UC’s position as a strong, research-led institution which, in the face of strong competition for student numbers, has continued to focus on core disciplines while nurturing research capabilities.

The University ranked in the top three in over half of the subject areas assessed, receiving an overall AQS(S) ranking of third in Aotearoa New Zealand.

UC ranked first in four subject areas*.

  • Ecology, evolution and behaviour
  • Marketing and tourism
  • Political science, international relations and public policy
  • Public health

*UC ranked first in three subject areas in 2012

UC ranked second in five subject areas:

  • Agriculture and other applied biological sciences
  • Chemistry
  • Engineering and technology
  • Foreign languages and linguistics
  • Music, literary arts and other arts

UC ranked third in six subject areas:

  • Law
  • Economics
  • Management, human resources, industrial relations and other businesses
  • Physics
  • Statistics
  • Visual arts and crafts

While the University excels in multiple subject areas, only areas with more than seven funded FTEs can be reported on.

Congratulations to all Colleges, Schools and Departments recognised in this year’s results.

For more on the 2018 PBRF results, click here>

Jump for health

We’ve all heard the recommended amount of daily exercise is 30 minutes, done at least five times a week. But what is the best way to get fit? High-intensity? High frequency?

Here’s your chance to find out.

PhD student Tane Clement from the School of Health Sciences | Kura Mātai Hauora is investigating how low-dose, high-frequency exercise on a trampoline affects aerobic capacity and common health markers such as blood pressure, cholesterol and weight.

Join in this research study for a chance to learn more about your health. The study involves completing 100 bounces of a trampoline three to five times a week, over a period of eight weeks. So about two minutes of exercise per day. An application will be used to record your jump height each day, with the goal being to improve the total jump height over the eight weeks.

The trampoline is located in the Robert J. Scott Atrium (Mechanical Engineering building), so is nice and convenient for anyone who comes into uni each day anyway.

If you’re interested in volunteering for the study or to sign up, contact Tane for more information>

The project is being carried out by Tane Clement, under the supervision of Nick Draper and Keith Alexander. Nick can be contacted at nick.draper@canterbury.ac.nz. He will be pleased to discuss any concerns you may have about participation in the project.

Aotearoa New Zealand Three Rs award research grant extended until 14 April 2019

In July 2018, the National Animal Ethics Advisory Committee (NAEAC) launched 2 biennial awards to celebrate achievement in the development and implementation of the Three Rs. 

The Three Rs are considered the guiding principles for animal research, testing, and teaching. They are:

REPLACEMENT – Replacing animals with non-animal alternatives.

REDUCTION – Using as few animals as necessary.

REFINEMENT – The way experiments are carried out should be refined to reduce pain or suffering as much as possible, for example, by using painkillers, or the most advanced scientific methods.

Applications for the Aotearoa New Zealand John Schofield Three Rs implementation award closed on 5 October 2018.  However, the deadline for grant has been extended.

On offer (to an individual, group or institution within New Zealand) is a $50,000 research grant, which will provide funding for research specifically targeted at developing ways to replace, reduce, or refine the use of animals in research, testing, and teaching.

Applications for the Aotearoa New Zealand John Schofield Three Rs implementation close on 14 April 2019. 

To apply, visit the MPI website

There is a Staff Intranet Specifically For You

Did you know there is a staff intranet for you, depending on your type of role? Have a look at it, because there are a lot of links that you will probably find useful.

Open the UC Intranet Home page, look in the top left corner, and go from there.

To find the UC Intranet Home page:
1. Go to https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/
2. Scroll down to the bottom right corner (tap the End key on your keyboard to go straight there)
3. Click Intranet (Staff)

The Technology Information for Staff website also has links to the information that you are likely to need regularly at the University of Canterbury.


For great time-saving tips, look up our Archive of Tech Tips or look through the Technology Information for Staff website.

Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a comment below.

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