Tag Archives: staff success

UC Teaching Awards and Teaching Medal

Do you know an excellent teacher or teaching team who deserve wider recognition?
Then take a moment to nominate them for a UC Teaching Award or the UC Teaching Medal.

Nominations for the 2020 Teaching Awards and UC Teaching Medal are open from now until 18 May, so kick start your year now.

Don’t forget that there is also an award available for implementing a single special teaching innovation, and that all teaching awards also bring with them a financial reward. The process is simple: complete a one-step form.

All awards recognise excellence in teaching (including thesis supervision) in both undergraduate and graduate programmes. The teaching medal is UC’s highest award for teaching and leadership.
Further information and nomination forms are available on the Teaching Awards or the Teaching Medal websites.

Tangata Tū, Tangata Ora: Celebrating Excellence

UC’s inaugural Tangata Tū, Tangata Ora: Celebrating Excellence event was held on Wednesday 27 November, acknowledging the University’s accomplished Emeritus Professors and celebrating the winners of the UC’s 2019 Council Medals.

Congratulations to:

2019 Exercise New Zealand Industry Award Winner

Congratulations to Danielle Mather , Group Fitness Co-ordinator at UC Rec & Sport (UC RecCentre), who won the 2019 Group Exercise Instructor of the Year (Own Choreography) Award last weekend.

Marietta Mehanni, Danielle Mather, Maria Teresa Stone 

The New Zealand Exercise Industry Awards have been taking place annually since 2005, recognising excellence in the exercise and fitness industry. Judging was a three-stage process and took just over 3 months. Danielle submitted multiple videos of her teaching and personal reflection questions.  In the final stage, mystery shoppers evaluated the six finalists, who came from Christchurch, Nelson, Auckland and Wellington. Danielle was awarded the top prize in the awards ceremony  in Auckland.

Danielle’s journey started as a casual receptionist for the UC RecCentre in 2012, whilst studying full-time toward her BSc in Biology at the University of Canterbury.  At the encouragement of RecCentre staff, she undertook concurrent study at SIT to complete her Group Fitness Instructors Certificate.   In late 2013, Danielle stepped up to be acting Group Fitness Co-ordinator, whilst continuing her studies and working reception. At the completion of her BSc in 2014, she was successful in becoming the permanent Group Fitness Co-ordinator at the RecCentre.   She now leads a team of 50+ instructors and offers a broad programme of over 70+ classes per week in term time.

As a certified Skills Active Assessor, Danielle now trains budding UC Students to become group fitness instructors.  We have certified 15 new instructors since we started the programme in 2015, with five more currently receiving the helpful steady hand of Danielle as they complete their certification through on the job learning.

The team at UC Rec & Sport are extremely proud of Danielle’s journey and success so far, and we look forward to what’s to come. In the meantime, we’ll be jumping in on her classes at the RecCentre to get our daily dose of wellness!

ERSKINE PROGRAMME GRANT PROFILE – ANNICK MASSELOT

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Annick Masselot in Cambridge

What Department/School have you come from and what do you teach?
I come from the School of Law. I teach Employment Law and Advanced Employment Law, Contract Law, Gender and the Law, European Union Law and Legal Research Methods.  I also do some teaching in the Executive Development Programme where I teach Business Law for the MBA and the MBM degrees.

What interested you in the Grant opportunity?
One of my present line of research is concerned with the gender impact of Brexit. People wrongly think that Brexit and, what are considered to be the most relevant issues: Trade and migration, are gender neutral topics.  In reality, the most adversely impacted people are likely to be the least visible people: women and people from minority backgrounds.

The Cambridge Grant provided me with the opportunity to be based and do research in the United Kingdom at a time when political and legal developments around this theme were at their peak. The Grant further offered me the opportunity to be at Cambridge University where I could interact with experts in the field of constitutional and European Union law and political as well as gender studies scholars. As Cambridge is central to the UK, I knew I was also going to be able to do research in London, in particular at the British Parliament. I was also able to work with NGO and think tanks.

Being in the UK also provided a chance for me to disseminate my work in the country and also in other European Countries.

The grant is generous enough that I was able to do research without  worrying about where to live and I could take my family with me, which was a real bonus.

Where did you visit (i.e which institutions)?
I was a recipient of the Cambridge Grant so I spent most of my time at Cambridge University, where I was based in the Centre for European Legal Studies in the Faculty of Law.  During my time at Cambridge, I was also invited to deliver talks in other institutions.

  • ‘Gendertrouble while approaching the cliff edge Brexit?’ Queen’s University Belfast, The Centre for European and Transnational Studies, Belfast, 7 October 2019
  • ‘Jacinda Ardern and the development of a model of feminist foreign policy?’ feminist foreign policy in the EU context, Quaker Council for European Affairs, Brussels, 26 September 2019
  • ‘The gender impact of Brexit – Unpacking the ideology of socio-political institutions’, School of Law, Reading University, 16 October 2019 (with Roberta Guerrina UoBristol).

How will your time overseas benefit your teaching at UC?
The Cambridge Grant is mostly a research grant, as such it does not really consider teaching. However, I was also invited as a guest lecturer in the Jean Monnet Summer School on Gender and Brexit: Processes and Strategies for Gender Mainstreaming in the Process of Exiting the EU, University of Surrey (UK), 3-8 July 2019.

I delivered two lectures to a range of students and practitioners on (1) EU as a Gender Actor from Internal to External Affairs and (2) Gendering External Affairs – How is Trade gendered?

This experience together with the ability to share experience on European Union practices and on Brexit with practitioners provides unique experience which can be translated into vivid lectures at the University of Canterbury. Having first hand expertise in a topic makes us better teacher because we know what is going on on the ground.  

 Do you have any advice for potential future Grant applicants?
Don’t be shy, go forth and meet people outside UC.

 

Citation advantage for open access at UC

The scholarly publishing market is changing rapidly. The UC Library and R&I has been assessing the potential impact of developments such as Plan S on UC researchers to identify how we can prepare to meet them.

We investigated the rate of citation for articles produced by UC researchers and founding an overall citation advantage for research in open access publications. Specifically, we found that articles deposited in the UC Research Repository were cited 129% more often, on average, than articles only available behind a paywall (a.k.a. ‘closed access’).

Getting your work into the UC Research Repository is straight-forward:

  1. In Elements, upload the manuscript accepted by the publisher (and any other versions that you have).
  2. Select “Accepted version” and click deposit.

UC Library staff will double-check copyright compliance before uploading the correct version into the UC Research Repository. If you have questions or would like support with this process, get in touch with your subject librarian.

Making your work open access doesn’t have to involve costly article processing charges. Publish anywhere, deposit here.