Tag Archives: Symposium

International Health Promoting Campuses Symposium

When: Sunday 7 April, 9.30am – 3.30pm
Where: Sudima Hotel, Rotorua

Held the day before the International Union of Health Promotion Education (IUHPE) conference, the International Health Promoting Campuses Symposium aims to activate the Okanagan Charter on higher education campuses around the world. The Okanagan Charter calls to embed health into all aspects of campus culture and lead health promotion action and collaboration locally and globally. 

The one day symposium will be relevant for academics, management, students, educators, student support staff, researchers, health promotion and public health specialists, and all those interested in the promotion of health, wellbeing and sustainability within the tertiary education sector.

The symposium will provide a range of opportunities for participants to

  • Work with international and national experts experienced in designing health promoting campuses
  • Participate in the global health promoting universities and colleges movement and
  • Build collective engagement and commitment to implement the Okanagan Charter

To register, click here> 

Sexuality education symposium at UC

On 15-16 March internationally leading sexuality education researchers and local youth workers are convening at UC to engage with the public to consider what else sexuality education could become at State of the Art: New Directions in Sexuality Education/ Current Social Science Theories In Practice Symposium.

Panel presentations and interactive workshops will draw on cutting edge international and Australasian research and local initiatives to explore directions in sexuality education that can better equip diverse young people to engage meaningfully with both the pleasures and challenges of crafting intimate relationships in today’s world.

Topics include:

  • Sexuality Education Beyond the Classroom and Beyond Intervention: Lessons from The Beyond Bullying Project (Panel Presentation)
  • Engaging with diversity in sexuality education – new material and posthumanist provocations  (Professor Louisa Allan and Associate Professor Kathleen Quinlivan)
  • What do unicorns have to do with gender? How can research better inform practice to support gender diverse young people and their families? (Dr Sue Bagshaw)

What more can sexuality and relationships education become in an era of consumption and digital technologies?

Sexuality and relationships education is paradoxically both everywhere and nowhere in today’s world. A  lot of anxiety, and sometimes panic, surrounds learning about sexualities and relationships both within and outside schools.

Research shows that school based sexuality education programmes struggle to engage with contemporary sexualities and relationships issues with children and young people.

As a subject, sexuality education sits somewhat uncomfortably within schools. Programmes are under-resourced and under-valued and research shows that the curriculum struggles to make itself relevant and meaningful to young people in terms of their lived experiences of negotiating intimate relationships and pleasure in a digital world.

Young people feel frustrated with the emphasis on the biological aspects of sexuality, and  want to learn more about gender diversity, violence in relationships, intimacy, sexual pleasure and love.

Parents too, feel out of their depth with knowing how best to educate their children and young people about sexuality and relationships in an era of consumption and digital technologies.

Once framed as private, sexualities, relationships and gender politics are everywhere. Programmes such as Married at First Sight show adults negotiating the complexities of intimate relationships, including in some cases, relationships as commodities to be ‘shopped for’.

Campaigns such as #metoo are in response to sexual harassment (although not without consequences for some young women). Campaigns for sexual and gender diversity call into question heterosexuality and gender normalcy.

In an era of social and digital media, it’s not surprising to see diverse young people are increasingly taking sexuality education into their own hands. Sexting has increased amongst teens  in recent years, largely as a consensual activity, it occurs primarily  within the contexts of an intimate relationship.

However a recent Australian survey shows that  young women aged 18-19 in digital spaces are  more likely to be on the receiving end of degrading comments about gender, sexual harassment and unwanted sexual advances.

Rather than criminalise sexting, and telling young people not to do it, sexuality education researchers suggest that sexuality education needs to focus more on helping young people to imagine and participate in conversations related to sexualities and relationships both within and outside school.

For more information about speakers and topics, and to register, please click here.

IUTAM symposium a success

This week UC hosted the IUTAM Symposium on “Recent Advances in Moving Boundary Problems in Mechanics” with Symposium Chairs Dr Stefanie Gutschmidt and A/Prof Mathieu Sellier from the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

The Symposium was opened by a Mihi Whakatau (by Brett Tamati-Elliffe), a welcome to the City of Christchurch (by Councillor Jimmy Chen) and the welcome to the University of Canterbury (by Vice-Chancellor Dr Rod Carr).

The conference was a success with international experts from 18 nations presenting state-of-the-art research in the fields of theoretical and applied mechanics. This was a great opportunity to showcase UC and connect both nationally and internationally.

International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics symposium 12-15 Feb

The University of Canterbury will host the IUTAM symposium on “Moving Boundary Problems in Mechanics” from 12-15 February 2018.

The mission of IUTAM – the International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics – is to encourage the development and application of all branches of the science of mechanics throughout the world.

The symposium, co-chaired by Dr Stefanie Gutschmidt and Associate Professor  Mathieu Sellier of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, is the second symposium ever to be organized in New Zealand. It is an exciting opportunity to showcase the University of Canterbury new premises, in particular the newly built Engineering Core and lab facilities.

Approximately 60 international experts in applied mechanics, fluid mechanics, and engineering science from over 17 countries will gather to further develop analytical, experimental, and computational methods and push the boundaries of moving boundary problems in mechanics.

Understanding boundary problems

Many problems in mechanics involve deformable domains with moving boundaries.

  • An archetypical example would be how the sail of boat deforms in response to the wind to produce a resultant aerodynamic force. The complex fluid-structure interaction between the flowing air and the sail’s internal stress leads to given deformation of the sail.
  • Other examples include flows with a free surface, flows over soft tissues and textiles, flows involving accretion and erosion, flows through deformable porous media, material forming, shape optimization, to name but a few.

The interaction of the moving boundary with the participating media leads to fascinating phenomena in a broad range of contexts such as wing flutter, wave-breaking, sand dune formation, ripple formation on the ocean floor, flow instabilities, structure resonance and failure, atherosclerosis, ice formation on aircraft wings, etc .

Understanding this two-way interaction is a challenge of modern mechanics. 

UC Presents International Flute Symposium 2017

This Waitangi Weekend, UC School of Music presents the International Flute Symposium 2017, featuring internationally acclaimed flautist Emily Beynon .

The Symposium is being held at Rangi Ruru Girls’ School and includes a Gala Concert where she will perform with other local and international artists including:

  • UC School of Music Flute tutor and Christchurch Symphony Orchestra principal flute Anthony Ferner
  • James Kortum (Lecturer in Flute, Sydney Conservatorium of Music)
  • Bridget Douglas (Principal Flute, NZSO.)

The Symposium marks the beginning of an exciting new era for the UC School of Music as teaching and performance activities are relocated to the Arts Centre this month.

The International Flute Symposium 2017 is a three-day Symposium packed with masterclasses and performances drawing on the expertise of some of the world’s best players brought to Christchurch by the UC School of Music.

flute player
Emily Beynon. Photo: Roland Krämer

Emily Beynon is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Music in London and is a highly regarded performer and teacher with a long history as principal flute of the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra in Amsterdam. She also performs with many other orchestras across Europe. A passionate and dedicated teacher, Emily is regularly invited to give masterclasses internationally.

Associated artists James Kortum (Lecturer in Flute, Sydney Conservatorium of Music), Bridget Douglas (Principal Flute, NZSO) and UC School of Music Flute Tutor Anthony Ferner (CSO Principal Flute) will join Emily to perform in the Symposium Gala Concert on Sunday evening featuring works by composers including Otar Taktakishvili, Georges Hüe, Toru Takemitsu and UC School of Music Associate Professor Chris Cree Brown.

For more information on the Symposium click here or contact Anthony Ferner ajferner@gmail.com ph 021 244 4023. A Flute Symposium daily and half day observer fee is available.

The Gala Concert starts at 7pm on Sunday Evening, 5 February at the Merivale Lane Theatre, Rangi Ruru Girls’ School, 59 Hewitts Rd, Merivale. Tickets are $40 Adult, $15 Student, Door Sales Only.