Tag Archives: Symposium

Waterways Post Graduate Symposium reveals depth of student talent

The Waterways Centre for Freshwater Management hosted its annual Post Graduate Student Symposium at Lincoln University on 19 November. Students from both Lincoln and Canterbury universities presented topics from a wide array of disciplines including human and physical geography, genetics, fresh water invertebrates and fish, groundwater, climatology.

Issie Barrett from the UC Freshwater Ecology Research Group (FERG) group won the first prize for her oral presentation on her research into negative resistance and resilience in freshwater communities. For the first time in the history of the symposium three UC students tied for the second place in the oral presentations competition (Alice West – FERG, Bridget White – FERG, and Rasool Porhammat – Geography). Deborah Paull (UC Biology) won the Water New Zealand People’s Choice for best presentation on the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in surface drinking waters.

The quality of presentations (both oral and posters) improve with every year and new categories of prizes may be required to acknowledge and celebrate the hard work students put into their presentations. Numbers of attendants (some flew in from all over New Zealand) also set a new record, reinforcing the fact that interest from the wider community in multi-disciplinary research into freshwater management issues continues to be strong, and that the symposium is an excellent product which meets this demand.

Deborah Paull, winner of Water New Zealand’s People’s Choice Award for Oral Presentation

Technology Enhanced Learning Spaces: Symposium

This symposium is an opportunity for the UC e-Lab to share and celebrate current research and development so we can learn more about the breadth and depth of e-learning research at UC and beyond.

Date: 25 Nov 2019
Time: 9.30am (for 10am start) – 3.30pm
Location: Rehua 103, Ilam Campus, University of Canterbury (Zoom location for virtual participants TBA)
RSVP: by 20 Nov to Cheryl.brown@canterbury.ac.nz

The theme is “Technology Enhanced Learning Spaces”, which we see as relating widely to all kinds of learning places and spaces including virtual and online blends.  The event will also be a celebration and acknowledgement of Distinguished Professor Niki Davis and her contribution to the Lab as its founding Director and leader.

Highlights include opening plenary by Professor Una Cunningham from Stockholm University who is speaking on Interlinked physical and virtual learning spaces as well as 13 Gasta presentations (short concise 5 min presentations) by students, staff and collaborators (including international expert on digital addiction Dr Olatz Fernandez Lopez from Monash University). It will be a thought provoking event with lots of opportunity for connection and discussion. The day will be concluded by Distinguished Professor Niki Davis reflecting on Co-evolving Technology Enhanced Learning Spaces.

For a more detailed program and brief descriptions of presentations see here>

Register for the Waterways Center for Freshwater Management Postgraduate Student Annual Symposium

Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere opening into the Pacific Ocean. Credit: Katie Colucio

Thinking about researching freshwater management issues, or supervising promising students who want to do the same? Brought to you by the Waterways Centre for Freshwater Management, postgraduate students from the University of Canterbury and Lincoln University are showcasing their research from a wide range of disciplines. This includes the extent of micro-plastic contamination within the Avon/Ōtakaro river or the impact of climate change on water resources in Cambodia. You can also find out about ‘who is eating who’ in South Island alpine tarns or the effects of off-road vehicles on the shores of Lake Ellesmere/Te Waihora. Attendance is free and the day is fully catered!

When: Tuesday 19 November, 9-5pm

Where: Lincoln University, Stewart Building.

Registration closes 5 November and can be done here.

International Health Promoting Campuses Symposium

When: Sunday 7 April, 9.30am – 3.30pm
Where: Sudima Hotel, Rotorua

Held the day before the International Union of Health Promotion Education (IUHPE) conference, the International Health Promoting Campuses Symposium aims to activate the Okanagan Charter on higher education campuses around the world. The Okanagan Charter calls to embed health into all aspects of campus culture and lead health promotion action and collaboration locally and globally. 

The one day symposium will be relevant for academics, management, students, educators, student support staff, researchers, health promotion and public health specialists, and all those interested in the promotion of health, wellbeing and sustainability within the tertiary education sector.

The symposium will provide a range of opportunities for participants to

  • Work with international and national experts experienced in designing health promoting campuses
  • Participate in the global health promoting universities and colleges movement and
  • Build collective engagement and commitment to implement the Okanagan Charter

To register, click here> 

Sexuality education symposium at UC

On 15-16 March internationally leading sexuality education researchers and local youth workers are convening at UC to engage with the public to consider what else sexuality education could become at State of the Art: New Directions in Sexuality Education/ Current Social Science Theories In Practice Symposium.

Panel presentations and interactive workshops will draw on cutting edge international and Australasian research and local initiatives to explore directions in sexuality education that can better equip diverse young people to engage meaningfully with both the pleasures and challenges of crafting intimate relationships in today’s world.

Topics include:

  • Sexuality Education Beyond the Classroom and Beyond Intervention: Lessons from The Beyond Bullying Project (Panel Presentation)
  • Engaging with diversity in sexuality education – new material and posthumanist provocations  (Professor Louisa Allan and Associate Professor Kathleen Quinlivan)
  • What do unicorns have to do with gender? How can research better inform practice to support gender diverse young people and their families? (Dr Sue Bagshaw)

What more can sexuality and relationships education become in an era of consumption and digital technologies?

Sexuality and relationships education is paradoxically both everywhere and nowhere in today’s world. A  lot of anxiety, and sometimes panic, surrounds learning about sexualities and relationships both within and outside schools.

Research shows that school based sexuality education programmes struggle to engage with contemporary sexualities and relationships issues with children and young people.

As a subject, sexuality education sits somewhat uncomfortably within schools. Programmes are under-resourced and under-valued and research shows that the curriculum struggles to make itself relevant and meaningful to young people in terms of their lived experiences of negotiating intimate relationships and pleasure in a digital world.

Young people feel frustrated with the emphasis on the biological aspects of sexuality, and  want to learn more about gender diversity, violence in relationships, intimacy, sexual pleasure and love.

Parents too, feel out of their depth with knowing how best to educate their children and young people about sexuality and relationships in an era of consumption and digital technologies.

Once framed as private, sexualities, relationships and gender politics are everywhere. Programmes such as Married at First Sight show adults negotiating the complexities of intimate relationships, including in some cases, relationships as commodities to be ‘shopped for’.

Campaigns such as #metoo are in response to sexual harassment (although not without consequences for some young women). Campaigns for sexual and gender diversity call into question heterosexuality and gender normalcy.

In an era of social and digital media, it’s not surprising to see diverse young people are increasingly taking sexuality education into their own hands. Sexting has increased amongst teens  in recent years, largely as a consensual activity, it occurs primarily  within the contexts of an intimate relationship.

However a recent Australian survey shows that  young women aged 18-19 in digital spaces are  more likely to be on the receiving end of degrading comments about gender, sexual harassment and unwanted sexual advances.

Rather than criminalise sexting, and telling young people not to do it, sexuality education researchers suggest that sexuality education needs to focus more on helping young people to imagine and participate in conversations related to sexualities and relationships both within and outside school.

For more information about speakers and topics, and to register, please click here.