Tag Archives: Transformation

New building names – Meremere and Len Lye

Meremere  ̶̶  Business and Law

The Business and Law building lies at the heart of campus along with Matariki, Puaka-James Hight, Te Ao Mārama and Rehua. These five key buildings are ‘pou’ (pillars) for UC.

The Business and Law building has been renamed Meremere, and is an extension of the star theme for pou of UC. In Māori astronomy, Meremere is known as the evening star and is associated with the start of summer.

Around the world, Meremere is also commonly known as Venus – the second planet from the sun and the brightest celestial object after the sun and moon.

 Len Lye – School of Product Design

The former Engineering and Science Annex building is now home to the new School of Product Design, a place which inspires a culture of innovative creativity.

Inspirational and unconventional artist Len Lye was born in Christchurch and is New Zealand’s most well-known international artist. The notion that the creative arts, which are central to design, should be underpinned by practical technologies (science and engineering) to create novel products is highly consistent with the ideals of Len Lye.

Following Lye’s death in 1980 the Len Lye Foundation was established by UC alumni John Matthews (awarded a UC Honorary Doctorate 2015). Len Lye is well-known to students of arts and visual communication, a cohort represented strongly in the Bachelor of Product Design.

Blue CLUES (what’s that?) and working more effectively in Teams: UC’s Organisational Culture Development – update #4

Nau mai haere mai!

Blue CLUES
Blue CLUES* is a newly formed learning community for UC Leaders supporting the organisational culture development programme. The purpose of the community is to support constructive relationships and connections that encourage learning from each other and from experts, enable sharing and solving of challenges, and provide a place for collaborating on opportunities and initiatives.

Culture Leaders are SMT-nominated and generally include all members of an area’s Executive team, those leading teams of five or more, plus others in significant or influential roles in that area. To prepare for facilitating the debrief of the OCI/OEI results as well as enable ongoing culture development and initiatives within their area and beyond, Culture Leaders undertake the LSI, attend UC’s Leading Change and Coaching Conversations workshops, and a 2-day Culture Leader training workshop facilitated by Human Synergistics.

The inaugural Blue CLUES was held on the 22 March and 130 of the current 180 UC Culture Leaders attended. The two-hour session began with a presentation from Shaun McCarthy (Human Synergistics). Then followed a panel Q&A session – with Rod Carr, Darryn Russell, Anne Scott, Iain MacPherson, Janet Carter, Catherine Moran and Letitia Fickel, along with Shaun and Pam Wilson (Human Synergistics).

It was great to see the engagement and interest from those present. You can read more about this session and watch YouTube footage on the Blue CLUES website. More sessions are planned. Culture Leaders – your ideas on the structure and content of further sessions is welcomed via the survey on the webpage link above or you can email organisational.development@canterbury.ac.nz.

*’Blue’ refers to the four constructive styles – Achievement, Self-Actualising, Humanistic-Encouraging and Affiliative.
CLUES is an acronym formed from Culture Leadership Understanding and Education Seminars.

Team Management Profile – a Pilot
As part of our culture development efforts, we are piloting a tool called the Team Management Profile to assist individuals within teams to analyse their work style preferences and consider their implications for effective team performance. Participating in this individual and team analysis, together with facilitated discussions about how we work together, supports the constructive behaviours we are building across UC.

The Team Management Profile (TMP)…

“… gives you insights into how you prefer to work and how you are likely to interact with others in the workplace…..The Profile gives you information about your probable areas of strengths at work and within a team. It is the starting point for learning and development, and a tool that will give you a better understanding of how to maximise your potential and work with others.”

Here’s more about the tool and the research behind it.

We’ve approached a small number of work areas to pilot this programme. Once we’ve evaluated how this supports the organisational culture development already underway, we’ll decide whether to utilise this more widely. If you would like more information about this pilot you can talk to my colleague Karen Grant.

Finding Out More
– See UC’s Culture Journey website for more information on the UC programme, tools, articles and white papers, FAQs and more.
– Share your good news stories about culture change. Snippet of news? Use the short format. More reflective story to tell? Use the slightly longer format (suitable for Culture Leaders).
Previous blogs

Mā te wā
Noho ora mai
Karen Mather, Organisational Development Manager

UC’s Organisational Culture Transformation – update #3 – Hui Method, Organisational Culture in the news …

Living the four constructive behaviours: How the “Hui Method” supports our desired organisational culture

Thinking of things cultural, this is a shout-out for engagement with the staff professional development opportunity Tangata Tū, Tangata Ora. I refreshed my knowledge last week – along with a group of nineteen engaged academic and general staff from across UC. This reminded me of the inclusive practices that are exemplified in the “Hui Method” (aka The Mihi Method) which is modelled in the programme.

This process developed out of research at the University of Otago contains four key elements:
1. Mihi – initial greeting and engagement
2. Whakawhanaungatanga – making a connection
3. Kaupapa – attending to the main purpose of the encounter and
4. Poroporoaki – concluding the encounter and ensuring clarity about the next steps.

The facilitators Ripeka and Abby encouraged us to consider the use of this method for a number of situations. Examples we discussed included: an inclusive way of teaching in both large and small group settings, use in other student interactions, and how this could positively change the format of meetings. The concept appeared to resonate for all of us there.

Using the Hui Process will reinforce the constructive behaviours described by Human Synergistics – from both the individual and organisational perspective. Mihi and Whakawhanaungatanga create an environment of participation, trust and commitment. In other words the Humanistic-Encouraging and Affiliative behaviours. Focusing on Kaupapa after the building of engagement and connection fosters Achievement characteristics. The articulation and clarification of agreed next steps reinforce that style. The entire process supports Self-Actualisation as this is about personal growth and development, about expanding experiences, and gaining fulfilment from doing a job well.

The Hui Method was developed in an educational health setting and seems to me to be a helpful way to support our bicultural aspirations, while helping us to model the operational culture we have described as desirable. See the Tangata tū, tangata ora website to register.

“The current consensus from Māori health leaders, student feedback and anecdotal Māori patient feedback indicates the ‘Hui Process’ is easily learnt, well received by patients and can enhance the doctor–patient relationship”.

Lacey, Cameron & Huria, Tania & Beckert, Lutz & Gilles, Matea & Pitama, Suzanne. (2011). The Hui Process: A framework to enhance the doctor-patient relationship with Māori. The New Zealand medical journal. 124. 72-8.

If you are an academic staff member and you want to further reflect on your own practice, make connections and identify potential opportunities to embed culturally responsive pedagogy see Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: From Theory to Practice.

Feature Articles – organisational culture in the news
I’ve been seeing and hearing a lot about Organisational Culture in the news (and I don’t believe it is just frequency illusion!) People seem to be more aware of the impact of workplace culture on their practices, services, staff wellbeing and organisational success. Below are some examples. I am keen for some that show impact from a more positive aspect – send me any you find.

1. Should we steer clear of the winner-takes-all approach? Researchers reflect on an initiative in New Zealand to make science more inclusive. (Nature, International Journal of Science)

“At a time of great global divisiveness, moves are afoot to make the research culture more welcoming, respectful and responsible …. The winner-takes-all model is not the only way to make big breakthroughs in research ….”.

2. Interview with Deloitte’s forensic director Lorinda Kelly (audio): “New Zealand least corrupt in the world” (Radio NZ The Panel)

“… sub-culture … it was OK to be doing the things they were doing and it was the way everybody was behaving in that small group … corrupt culture that enabled the behaviour to carry on…”

3. “EQC culture change is long overdue” (Stuff editorial)

“….EQC seemed increasingly like a throwback to the bad old days of tight-lipped, defensive organisations that did not always seem to have local interests at heart”.

Finding Out More
– See UC’s Culture Journey website for more information on the UC programme, tools, articles and whitepapers, FAQs and more.
– Share your good news stories about culture change. Snippet of news? Use the short format. More reflective story to tell? Use the slightly longer format (suitable for Culture Leaders).
– Previous blog – Blog #2.

Ngā mihi nui
Karen Mather
Organisational Development Manager

UC’s Organisational Culture Transformation – update #2

News
The College of Science 2-day Culture Leader workshop was held last week. Twenty-seven Culture Leaders (Heads, other senior staff and Team Leaders) engaged with each other, theories of Organisational Culture, other content and their results. Pro-Vice-Chancellor Wendy Lawson observed

“It was an intense couple of days for our group of ‘culture leaders’. But the next steps are even more important: sharing the results with our colleagues in a way that supports understanding, and planning next steps.”

The now well-tried and tested workshop agenda includes:
– The “How Culture Works” model (Circumplexes, Outcomes and Causal Factors),
– A case-study exercise using the overall UC results, and
– The release and debrief of the ‘local’ results – at the unit and sub-unit levels.

This brings the number of Culture Leaders who’ve been through the 2-day workshop to 180.

Sharing News and Good Stories
Can you relate any positive experience within your team, your wider work area, or across UC to the organisational culture programme activities you have been undertaking? Please take a couple of minutes to tell that story. There’s two questions plus a few demographics and you can repeat this at any time. I’d love to hear your experiences.

Culture Leaders – there is a slightly longer survey you can utilise asking a little detail about experiences and reflections as well as positive stories.

Feature Article: The Interactive Circumplex
The interactive circumplex on the Human Synergistics website is a great tool for getting your head around the lens ‘shift’ of the 12 styles from an Individual style perspective to the Organisational Culture view i.e. the Behavioural Norms which are encouraged, discouraged or tolerated. All the elements of the Circumplex are defined and explained as you click on them.

A good example is:
– Click on Individual level: Personal Managerial or Leadership Styles view (left-hand side) and then click on the Perfectionist segment and you will reveal…

“Perfectionistic: Based on the need to attain flawless results, avoid failure and the tendency to equate self-worth with the attainment of unreasonably high standards. People high in this style are preoccupied with details, place excessive demands on themselves and others and tend to show impatience, frustration and indifference toward others’ needs and feelings.”

– Then click on Organisational level (Behavioural Norms) on the left and then on the Perfectionistic segment and you’ll see…

“A Perfectionistic culture characterises organisations in which perfectionism, persistence, and hard work are valued. Members feel they must avoid all mistakes, keep track of everything, and work long hours to attain narrowly defined objectives.”

This lens shift shows the difference between an individual who has a Perfectionist workstyle (measured by the LifeStyles Inventory) and an organisational culture that encourages Perfectionistic work habits (measured through the Organisational Culture Inventory).

Planning timeline
The indicative timeline for planning the organisational culture programme in each area is as shown below (click to enlarge)….

Finding Out More
– See UC’s Culture Journey website for more information on the UC programme, tools, articles and whitepapers, FAQs and more.
– Previous blog: #1: https://blogs.canterbury.ac.nz/intercom/2018/01/24/ucs-organisational-culture-transformation/

Ngā mihi nui
Karen Mather
Organisational Development Manager

Official Ernest Rutherford building opening

The Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has officially opened the new Ernest Rutherford building.

Stage 1 of the $220 million Rutherford Regional Science and Innovation Centre (RRSIC), the Ernest Rutherford building  was opened with fanfare and fireworks, in front of hundreds of invited guests, including Professor Mary Fowler, great-granddaughter of Lord Rutherford, UC’s famous alumnus. Professor Fowler, a geophysicist, has been Master of Darwin College, Cambridge, UK, since October 2012, and was guest of honour. 

See below for a gallery of photos. (Check out volcanologist Ben Kennedy’s volcano hat!)

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