Tag Archives: UC Diversity

Feedback welcome on UC’s Harassment Policy

UC’s Harassment Policy is under review. Staff and students are welcome to provide feedback on the draft Policy before it is updated. Feedback may be emailed to summer.pringle@canterbury.ac.nz by 12.00pm on Thursday 3 May. Alternatively, Tim Turnbull and Summer Pringle from HR, along with Julie Pratt from Student Services, will be available to receive feedback in person at an informal drop-in session on Thursday 3 May between 11.00am and 12.00pm in the Engineering Core meeting room 1 (room 129 on the ground floor).

Video release – UC’s Roimata unveiled

A stunning video about the unveiling of Roimata has been released as part of turning the original Cultural Narrative video into a series.

Roimata is the name given to a sculpture designed by Māori artist Riki Manuel (Ngāti Porou) to commemorate the seventh anniversary of the Canterbury earthquake on 22 February 2011. It was unveiled at a special ceremony on that date in 2018, and tells a story of remembrance.

  • To Māori, the upside down koru represents death, in keeping with a memorial to those who lost their lives in the February earthquake of 2011.
  • The surface is undulated to represent Ōtakaro the river Avon, onto which the people of Ōtautahi Christchurch, throw flowers each year in memory of that fateful day. The bronze flowers on the surface depict this ritual.
  • The sculpture sits at the Clyde Road end of University Drive, a short distance from the Recreation Centre bridge over Ōtakaro where those who attended the unveiling carried out this ritual by throwing fresh flowers onto the river to created a spiritual link with the commemorative service being held later that day in the city.

Roimata, will remain on our campus as a permanent reminder of the earthquakes, and as a focus each year for our remembrance, the loss and suffering of our University community, the contribution they made afterwards, and what the University has become since.

Thursdays in Black re-launch – 22 March

Being safe on campus, in public or in your home is everyone’s right, regardless of your race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender identity, class, disability (visible or not), religious affiliation, political views, or even the way you choose to dress. 

Thursdays in Black is a national student/whanau movement that works towards a world free of rape and violence. #TIB campaigns for campuses to be safe for everyone.

The UCSA has teamed up with the UC Thursdays in Black Society for the 2018 relaunch BBQ. Head down to C-Block lawn from 11am on Thursday 22 March for a free sausage, a few tunes and a special  guest speaker.

Come for a chat, with the people dressed in BLACK. They will happily provide information about the campaign and how you can get involved. We want to hear what you want, and give you information about all the  support services available on our campus and in the Christchurch area.

Make sure you wear BLACK and come along to be a part of positive change on campus.

Sexuality education symposium at UC

On 15-16 March internationally leading sexuality education researchers and local youth workers are convening at UC to engage with the public to consider what else sexuality education could become at State of the Art: New Directions in Sexuality Education/ Current Social Science Theories In Practice Symposium.

Panel presentations and interactive workshops will draw on cutting edge international and Australasian research and local initiatives to explore directions in sexuality education that can better equip diverse young people to engage meaningfully with both the pleasures and challenges of crafting intimate relationships in today’s world.

Topics include:

  • Sexuality Education Beyond the Classroom and Beyond Intervention: Lessons from The Beyond Bullying Project (Panel Presentation)
  • Engaging with diversity in sexuality education – new material and posthumanist provocations  (Professor Louisa Allan and Associate Professor Kathleen Quinlivan)
  • What do unicorns have to do with gender? How can research better inform practice to support gender diverse young people and their families? (Dr Sue Bagshaw)

What more can sexuality and relationships education become in an era of consumption and digital technologies?

Sexuality and relationships education is paradoxically both everywhere and nowhere in today’s world. A  lot of anxiety, and sometimes panic, surrounds learning about sexualities and relationships both within and outside schools.

Research shows that school based sexuality education programmes struggle to engage with contemporary sexualities and relationships issues with children and young people.

As a subject, sexuality education sits somewhat uncomfortably within schools. Programmes are under-resourced and under-valued and research shows that the curriculum struggles to make itself relevant and meaningful to young people in terms of their lived experiences of negotiating intimate relationships and pleasure in a digital world.

Young people feel frustrated with the emphasis on the biological aspects of sexuality, and  want to learn more about gender diversity, violence in relationships, intimacy, sexual pleasure and love.

Parents too, feel out of their depth with knowing how best to educate their children and young people about sexuality and relationships in an era of consumption and digital technologies.

Once framed as private, sexualities, relationships and gender politics are everywhere. Programmes such as Married at First Sight show adults negotiating the complexities of intimate relationships, including in some cases, relationships as commodities to be ‘shopped for’.

Campaigns such as #metoo are in response to sexual harassment (although not without consequences for some young women). Campaigns for sexual and gender diversity call into question heterosexuality and gender normalcy.

In an era of social and digital media, it’s not surprising to see diverse young people are increasingly taking sexuality education into their own hands. Sexting has increased amongst teens  in recent years, largely as a consensual activity, it occurs primarily  within the contexts of an intimate relationship.

However a recent Australian survey shows that  young women aged 18-19 in digital spaces are  more likely to be on the receiving end of degrading comments about gender, sexual harassment and unwanted sexual advances.

Rather than criminalise sexting, and telling young people not to do it, sexuality education researchers suggest that sexuality education needs to focus more on helping young people to imagine and participate in conversations related to sexualities and relationships both within and outside school.

For more information about speakers and topics, and to register, please click here.

Event: Oceanic Memory – islands, ecologies, people

Oceanic Memory: islands, ecologies, people
30 November – 2 December, 2017

UC Arts, 2 Worcester Boulevard, Christchurch

Nau Mai Haere Mai | Welcome | Afio Mai | Aere Mai | Malo e me’a mai | Fakatalofa atu | Veikidavaki | Fakaalofa lahi atu | Ulu tonu mai

Memories are complex, selective, and evolve over time. Some memories are hegemonic and powerful and some are subordinate and marginalized. This conference seeks to address the complex politics of cultural memory in the Pacific from a variety of critical perspectives.

This three day event features international keynote speakers from Australia, Fiji and the USA as well as UC’s very own Director of the the Macmillan Brown Centre for Pacific Studies, Professor Steven Ratuva.

Hosted by the College of Arts and the Macmillan Brown Centre for Pacific Studies in conjunction with Memory Research in Aotearoa Network.

Find out more and get tickets here>