Tag Archives: UC Māori

Hui Whakahōnore, April 2016

In April, a successful and enjoyable Hui Whakahōnore was held to celebrate our Māori graduates.

Fifteen graduates crossed the stage of the Jack Mann Theatre to receive their tohu. This year all Colleges were represented by Pro Vice-Chancellors or Deans and many heads of schools also attended.

It was marvelous for our ākonga to have this support as well as that of whānau. This is always a moving ceremony, as both graduates and whānau have the opportunity to reflect on their journey in tertiary education – a journey which is also a journey for whānau and one which often leads family members to consider and begin tertiary study.

This year, Emma Maurice, Tumuaki, Te Akatoki Māori Students Association, suggested a change to the conclusion of the celebration with the provision of a more formal lunch.  As a result of this proposal, kai was provided at the UCSA Event Centre, which was a wonderful opportunity for informal kōrero as well as speeches.  There has been a lot of feedback on how enjoyable the entire celebration was and how much people appreciated the manaaki provided.

Congratulations to our Māori graduates

Maori Graduation Celebrations, Jack Mann Theatre and Foundry, 20.4.16 Special guest Tiki Taane, musician.

Kurt James McLauchlan
Ngāti Raukawa
Master of Arts Major: Political Science

Jeffery James Franklin
Ngāi Tahu
Master of Business Administration

Angus Richard Hawke
Ngāi Tahu
Bachelor of Commerce in Economics and Human Resource Management

Canning Hoani Mason
Ngāti Awa, Rongomaiwahine, Ngāi Tai
Bachelor of Engineering with Second Class Honours (Division One) in Mechanical Engineering

Chanté Maata Botica
Ngāi Tahu
Bachelor of Teaching and Learning (Primary)

Eremia David James Tapsell
Te Arawa
Bachelor of Engineering with Second Class Honours (Division One) in Civil Engineering

Emma Frances Maurice
Ngāti Kahungunu ki Heretaunga
Bachelor of Arts with First Class Honours in Māori and Indigenous Studies

Forest Valentine Taane Morton
Ngāti Maniapoto
Bachelor of Laws

Jesney Rebekah Te Puke-Cowperthwaite
Tainui
Bachelor of Laws

Sione Areli
Ngāti Mutunga
Bachelor of Arts: History/Master of Teaching and Learning (Secondary) with Distinction

Shannan Te Roma Hauraki
Ngāti Haua
Bachelor of Science in Geology (endorsed in Environmental Science)

Rachel Elinor Robilliard
Ngāi Tahu
Bachelor of Science in Geography (endorsed in Environmental Science)

Rachel Mereana Panapa
Ngapuhi, Ngāti Whatua, Ngāti Tuwharetoa, Tainui
Bachelor of Sports Coaching (endorsed in He Oranga Tangata (Maori Health and Wellbeing)

Uenuku-mai-Rarotonga Warena White
Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Pikiao, Te Arawa, Te Āti awa, Ngāti Tama, Ngati Maniapoto
Bachelor of Arts in Te Reo Māori & Maori and Indigenous Studies

IN ABSENTIA
James Colin Perry
Te Arawa
Doctor of Philosophy

Laken Matekohe Karaki Wairau
Ngāi Tahu, Rongomaiwahine, Tapuika and Waitaha
Te Pourua Reo: Diploma in Languages (Te Reo Māori)

POSTHUMOUS AWARD
Caitlin Ellen Waghorn
Ngāi Tahu / Kai Tahu
Bachelor of Commerce

Photos from Hui Whakahōnore

Maori Graduation Celebrations, Jack Mann Theatre and Foundry, 20.4.16 Special guest Tiki Taane, musician.

Maori Graduation Celebrations, Jack Mann Theatre and Foundry, 20.4.16 Special guest Tiki Taane, musician.

Maori Graduation Celebrations, Jack Mann Theatre and Foundry, 20.4.16 Special guest Tiki Taane, musician.

Maori Graduation Celebrations, Jack Mann Theatre and Foundry, 20.4.16 Special guest Tiki Taane, musician.

Maori Graduation Celebrations, Jack Mann Theatre and Foundry, 20.4.16 Special guest Tiki Taane, musician.

The Influence of Culture on Organisational Resilience – presentation

Sabrina Daddar to present –

The Influence of Culture on Organisational Resilience: The Notion of Resilience for Māori-focused Organisations

Room 409, Business and Law Building, 26th April 11:00 – 12:00 noon

The Economics of Resilient Infrastructure (EoRI) project created and distributed a survey to organisations in the Greater Christchurch Urban area in late 2013, which found Māori-focused organisations “were more heavily impacted by the earthquakes than non-Maori-focussed organisations,” in which Māori organisations, in relation to their impacts, were more effective in their recovery, and exhibiting higher levels of resilience (Seville, Vargo, Giovinazzi, Stevenson, & Brown, 2014, p. 1). From this survey, a key point is that, in terms of a measure of organisational resilience, developed by the Resilient Organisations Research Programme (ResOrgs), illustrated that Maori-focused organisations scored higher than other organisations.

“This survey is the starting point for my research, as this is an example of a Western view regarding organisational resilience, which is a contestable concept. Much of the resilience literature in organisational research does not tend to focus on cultural issues or perspectives, as it tends to be written, uncritically, from the Western perspective. Thus, the purpose of this research study is to explore of the meaning of resilience from a Māori perspective and how it is implemented in Māori organisations following the 2010/2011 Christchurch earthquake sequence through their experiences. My thesis aims to study Māori organisational interpretations of this notion of “resilience:” (a) How do Māori view adversity? (b) How do Māori respond to adversity? and (c) How can Māori response to adversity inform a Western concept of resilience?

“The research design for this project will use He Awa Whiria/Braided Rivers approach, which is inductive, emergent qualitative in nature, using grounded theory methods, underpinned by Kaupapa Māori (Macfarlane, 2015). Data collection for my research will be through kanohi ki te kanohi/semi-structured interviews from Māori-focused units/organisations in Ōtautahi/Christchurch.

“The findings from my research will seek to conceptualize how Māori organisations exemplified resilience in the face of adversity during the earthquakes, as well as the post-disaster recovery phase. Moreover, my proposed research methodology, underpinned by Kaupapa Māori, will be unique in its approach by contributing to the gap of organisational resilience understandings from iwi Māori perspectives.”

Sabrina Daddar