Tag Archives: Workshop

Promoting your research in the media – Royal Society-led workshop 7-8 Feb 2019 – apply now

UC will be hosting the Science Media Centre’s first Science Media SAVVY workshop for 2019 over two days, 7-8 February, on UC’s Ilam campus.

Applications will close on 10 January 2019, so please get your application in before Christmas to avoid a rush after the holidays. It’s an excellent workshop, which Professors Tim Bell, Angus McIntosh, Jon Harding and other participants can attest to.

Entry to Science Media SAVVY workshops is by selection. There is usually high demand for the 12 available places in each SAVVY workshop.

What is it?
The Royal Society’s Science Media Centre leads a highly acclaimed series of media and communication skills workshops for researchers and scientists (including all those who use scientific methods in their research – not exclusively engineering and science disciplines) across New Zealand.

Participants gain practical techniques to improve communication, deal with nerves, adapt their message to their audience and respond effectively when an interview becomes challenging. The workshop offers strategies to successfully navigate a range of media encounters, with take-home lessons that also apply to improving stakeholder engagement, funding applications, public talks and outreach.

Evaluation survey results showed that most participants have ongoing, positive contacts with media following the workshop, feel more confident and effective as communicators and can identify impacts on their careers including new research collaborations.

Successful applicants for the workshop will be:

– Currently active researchers, in any field, employed in New Zealand
– Able to identify a research project or area of expertise of potential interest to media
– Experienced with media and/or likely to encounter media interest in future
– Highly motivated to strengthen their communication skills and confidence levels

Course fees for the two-day workshop are $595 +GST. (There may be additional needs-based funding support available – refer to the application form.)

Please contact Margaret Agnew if you have any questions about the Media SAVVY course (or you require media training or media advice).

Professional development – putting the AU back into whakawhanAUngatanga

John Kapa, Kapoipoi, Student Development Advisor Māori  explains the significance of putting the AU back into whakawhanAUngatanga, including an opportunity for professional development. 

Putting the AU back into whakawhanAUngatanga – Wednesday 14 November, 1.30pm-3.30pm

This is a workshop co-ordinated by the Professional Learning Community of in-house trainers.
Places are limited – if you would like to attend, please contact the Learning & Development team requesting an invitation (with the location) to be sent to you.

Relationships are important. The idea of AU (I) is more than being individualistic, rather it is also the strength of connection and working as a collective found in whakawhanAUngatanga. Whakawhanaungatanga is the act of and is the process of establishing links, making connections and relating to the people one meets by identifying in culturally appropriate ways, whakapapa linkages, past heritages, points of engagement, or other relationships.

In a metaphoric sense, Mead (2003) asserts that whanaungatanga reaches beyond actual whakapapa relationships and includes relationships to people who are not kin but who, through shared experiences, feel and act as kin.

Exploring this further, this session looks at your self-identified attributes around whanaungatanga to identify touch points and how this could be applied positively at work with peers or with ākonga (students) for example. This will be undertaken through exercises and pūrakau (stories).

 


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You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development.

New Workshop: Delegating and Influencing to achieve results

Register for the Delegating and Influencing workshop
on Tuesday 20 November, 9am – 4.30pm.

Delegation is a critical skill for leaders in today’s environment.
Fewer resources, changing motivations, and complex business goals are just a few of the challenges leaders face.

Influencing is another crucial element to successful leaders and teams – whether it’s an innovative breakthrough, a simple process improvement or a change in ‘the way things are done around here’, making it happen requires a strategy.

In this programme, participants learn the skills they need to address these challenges, gain the commitment of team members, develop individual skills and abilities, and enhance the overall capability and capacity of their teams and, ultimately, UC.

Don’t miss out, this course is too good to miss, and this is your last chance to register for at least another 6 months!


Is this course not quite what you are looking for? To see what other programmes are available, visit the Learning and Development website for more information.

 

Workshop on Reproducibility and Integrity in Scientific Research  

There is more and more evidence that findings from many scientific studies cannot be reproduced, casting doubt on the reliability of these studies. 

On October 26, 2018,  at the ‘Reproducibility and Integrity in Scientific Research’ workshop,  we will discuss the extent of this replication crisis, explore various methods that can be used to check whether a study can be replicated, and present tools that can be used to make one’s own research more reproducible and trustworthy.

  • Date: Friday 26 October, 9:00am – 17:00pm
  • Place: UC Business School, Meremere, Room 236
  • Registration (important for catering purposes): email tom.coupe@canterbury.ac.nz

 Speakers and titles of the presentations

[you can find abstracts here]

  • Anton Angelo (UC Library): Transparency and reproducibility – It’s all about layers.
  • Arin Basu (UC Health Sciences): What about Why?
  • Annette N. Brown (FHI 360, Chief Science Office): Which tests not witch hunts: A diagnostic approach to conducting replication research
  • Brian Haig (UC Psychology): Understanding replication in a way that is true to science.
  • Jeff Miller (University of Otago, Psychology): The statistical fundamentals of (non)-replicability
  • Thomas Pfeiffer (Massey University, Computational Biology/Biochemistry): Betting on your peers’ results: A tale of three markets
  • Robert Reed (UC Business School): An update on the progress of replications in economics
  • Philip Schluter (UC Health Sciences): A Bayesian alternative to hypothesis testing
  • Eric Vanman (University of Queensland, Psychology). How pre-registrations can improve science: Tales from the front-line
  • Ben Wood (Integra LLC): Lessons learned from running a social science replication program

PROGRAM

Time Activity
9:00-9:30 Registration
9:30-9:35 Introduction
9:35-11:05 SESSION: Replication – Theory and Current Status
11:05-11:30 Coffee Break
11:30-12:30 SESSION: How to Detect the Truth
12:30-13:30 Lunch
13:30-15:00 SESSION: Making Research More Reproducible
15:00-15:30 Coffee Break
15:30-16:30 SESSION: Observations from the Front Lines
16:30-17:00 Closing

More information on the replication crisis can be found on the Replication Network Website

This workshop is supported by the University of Canterbury Business School Research Committee.

Advanced Data Analysis (DA-2) Workshop

The UC Statistical Consulting Unit is offering a second two-day data analysis workshop over 5-6 September from 10am to 4pm (location: TBA).
 
The workshop extends concepts covered in our Introductory Data Analysis Workshop (DA-1) to include mixed effect models (useful for repeated measures), and generalized linear models (GLMs, useful for analysing counts and binary responses).
 
This two-day workshop consists of seminars and computer labs using the statistical software R. The workshop is open to staff and students.
 
To register, please email Daniel Gerhard at daniel.gerhard@canterbury.ac.nz.
 
All participants are expected to have good working knowledge of linear models, and a basic understanding of using the statistical software R.
 
For an introduction to data analysis with R, we highly recommend attending our DA-1 workshop in the next semester before participating in the advanced workshop.