Tag Archives: Workshop

DIY Beeswax Wraps for Plastic Free July!

Last week, UC Sustainability held a DIY workshop to celebrate our favourite month – Plastic Free July!

Plastic Free July is a global movement that helps millions of people be a part of the solution to plastic pollution. It’s a month long challenge which encourages all of us to ‘choose to refuse’ single use plastics – like takeaway coffee cups, drink bottles, straws, bags and plastic wrappers. We decided we would tackle Plastic Free July by showing our UC community how to make their own alternatives to single use plastics – and we had so much fun doing so!

Almost 100 students (and staff too!) came along and learnt how to make a DIY beeswax wrap and a produce bag with us, so we could all ‘choose to refuse’ this month (and hopefully longer!).For those that missed out, we’ve put together a guide for making your own wraps at home – they make great presents for friends and family too! Read on to see how we made our own beeswax wraps with nothing but some organic beeswax (grated), cotton fabric, scissors, baking paper and an iron. We hope you’ll be inspired to tackle Plastic Free July with us!

Step one: gather your materials

We recommend using only 100% cotton for making beeswax wraps – but don’t feel as though you have to rush off to a fabric store! All the fabric in these photos are either old tee shirts, or are from second hand stores (sheets and pillow cases are usually 100% cotton, and come in funky patterns – just give them a wash and an iron before use). If you want to buy new, Spotlight often has sales on cotton, and there’s a heap of different fabrics to choose from.

We sourced our beeswax from a friend who has bees, but you can get unpackaged beeswax in a small block from most Farmers Markets (including Riccarton Bush and Lyttelton). Bin Inn also sells beeswax in small cubes, but we prefer a block for grating.

We went through a whopping 1kg of beeswax making 100 wraps, but 100g – 200g of beeswax will be more than enough for making your wraps at home.

Step two: cut to size
What sizes you’re after is totally up to you! Here’s the guidelines we used:

  • Small (17cm x 20xm) is good for covering leftover dips, the end of a cucumber, half an avo, or the last mouthful of cheese
  • Medium (31cm x 27cm) is the popular size – it covers a small plate, wraps a sandwich, fits over the end of a 500g block of cheese and perfect for smaller snacks and treats
  • Big (35cm x 33cm) perfect for a large sandwich, wrap, easily covers salad bowls and leftovers in the fridge, and also doubles as an excellent plate on your picnic!

Step three: let’s make your wraps
Now for the fun part!

1. Place your fabric onto a piece of baking paper (we put a towel down first, to avoid a mess!). Sprinkle a small handful of grated beeswax onto the fabric (less is more, as you can always add more afterwards). Make sure the beeswax is spread evenly.

2. Place another piece of baking paper on top of the fabric.

3. Using the iron, firmly press down onto the baking paper. You’ll see the beeswax melting almost immediately. Iron the baking paper as you would normally iron fabric – making sure the beeswax is pushed all the way into the corners (you’ll be able to see through the baking paper – see the pictures below).

4. When all the beeswax is melted and your fabric looks wet, you’re done. Remove the top layer of baking paper and check the beeswax is melted. It should look like the picture on the left below, with an even amount of melted beeswax. The picture on the right needs another go with the iron to melt and re-spread some of the beeswax that has already started to dry.

5. Next, remove the beeswax from the bottom piece of baking paper and hang to dry before it hardens and sticks (you have to be a bit speedy here, but be careful as the wax will be hot). We recommend pegging the wet wrap to a coat hanger or a washing line. It will only take a few minutes to harden and dry completely.

6. You’re done! You’ve just made a beautiful beeswax wrap which will help you say goodbye to plastic cling film for good (plus it makes for much prettier lunches!). To use, wrap around your food or bowl as you would with plastic wrap, and use the warmth of your hands to ‘seal’ the wrap in place. Instant eco-warrior!

Just a few things to note…

  • to clean your wrap, gently hand wash in cool water with a small amount of dishwashing liquid. Hot water will remove the beeswax!
  • please don’t cover raw meat with your wrap – if you need to cover raw meat, use a container or cover it with another plate in the fridge
  • if your wrap starts to lose its ‘stick’ – simply begin the process again! You’ll be able to re-wax and continue to use your wrap for years to come. If it eventually starts to look a little worse for wear, pop it into your compost bin (another reason we love cotton!).

Thanks to everyone who came along to the workshop last week, we hope you had as much fun as we did, and are enjoying using your beeswax wraps. Keep an eye on our Facebook page for more Plastic Free July activities later this week, including student bloggers and the last of our plastic free giveaways.

If you make these at home, we’d love to see the results! Send your best wrap pictures to sustainability@canterbury.ac.nz. 

This message was bought to you by the UC Sustainability Office. Stay connected and follow us on Facebook, Instagram or sign up to our newsletter to stay in the loop about campus sustainability. This is part of our contribution to Plastic Free July, where we encourage our UC community quit single use plastics for the month. For more information and tips, see the Plastic Free July website.

UC Sustainability Champion: Meet Elizabeth

Elizabeth Peters | Masters in Marketing, Plastic Free Blogger and Eco VolunteerThis year, we’re proud to be profiling students and staff who we believe are contributing to the culture of sustainability at UC. We are running this campaign in the lead up to the 2019 UC Sustainability Awards, so get thinking about who you’ll be nominating this year! Nominations for the Awards are open from the 5 – 31 August.

In the meantime, read on and enjoy our latest Sustainability Champion profile from plastic free blogger Elizabeth – we caught up with her just in time for Plastic Free July!

29871827_10155490801062336_7562871590863254003_oElizabeth making a ‘plastic free promise’ during Plastic Free July 2018

Tell us about yourself!

My name is Elizabeth, I grew up in Christchurch. I did my undergraduate at University of Canterbury in Marketing and Management and I am currently doing my Master’s in Marketing on the topic of non-profit advertising. I spent my later years of my childhood growing up in the country and love being in nature. I now flat in town and love biking through the greener areas of Christchurch that remind me of home.

Tell us how you became involved with sustainability at UC.

I started coming along to a few events throughout my undergraduate studies, but it wasn’t until this last year that I got involved with the UC Sustainability Office and started helping more.  I love the work that the sustainability team is doing and wanted to be a part of it which I do through Eco Volunteering.

What has been a sustainability project that has meant a lot to you?

For an assignment at university we were set with a challenge to change a behavior of ours that would not only better ourselves but also the society in which we live. I chose to give up plastic. I began with the broad goal to give up all plastics… However, it was not until I started recording my plastic consumption that it started to dawn on me how pervasive plastic was in my life! Since I began this journey in 2017, I have learnt and continue to learn about the problem, and various ways in which I can be a part of the solution. I have learnt through personal experience and from the experience and research of others. Over the summer I started a blog called Glasshouse Refillery to share my journey. I also share some of my regular rhythms to living a more sustainable lifestyle on my Instagram and Facebook page – if you’re interested you can find me here: @glasshouserefillery.

I’m also volunteering my time (and my sewing machine!) at the Sustainability Office’s Plastic Free July workshop on Tuesday. Drop in and learn to make (and take home) a produce bag and a beeswax wrap and take a stand against plastic pollution with us! See the Facebook event here for all the details.

What is something that has made you feel really proud and a part of UC? 

I often bike to university and leading up to UC Sustainability’s Bike Breakfast event the bike shed was so full I had to go to one on the other side of campus! While the bike shed isn’t always full (particularly in winter!), it is great to see so many students and staff choosing to cycle to university. I am also proud to be a part of UC Sustainability’s journey in their BYO cups and containers initiative (and the cup library) at the various cafes and food establishments on campus.

Where to next for you?

Though I will soon finish my studies and no longer be a student, I will continue to do my bit for this wonderful planet that we are blessed to live on. I still have a long road ahead on my sustainability journey, but I will endeavor to be an eco-advocate where my life leads me. Endeavoring to encourage others and myself to continue to make small changes that have a big impact.

This message was bought to you by the UC Sustainability Office. Stay connected and follow us on Facebook, Instagram or sign up to our newsletter to stay in the loop about campus sustainability. This blog is part of our Sustainability Champions Campaign, where we profile UC students and staff doing great things for sustainability. This is part of our wider communications plan for the 2019 UC Sustainability Awards. For more information, and for the Awards nomination form, see our website.

 

Engaging Line Managers in Workplace Learning

Do you struggle with getting the buy-in, support and commitment of line managers to workplace learning? This was one of the key challenges colleagues of ours raised for 2019 and is critical if we actually want people doing things differently in the workplace.

This presentation is based on the work of an NZ based L&D team and the tips and tricks they used to get line managers engaged and team members doing things differently. You will also get the chance to discuss ways you have used to get the support of managers and getting people performing better on the job.

The event is publicly run by New Zealand Association for Training and Development (NZATD). Click here to register.

Event Plan
Date: Thursday, 18th July 2019
Time:  5.30 – 6.00 pm : Registration, Networking
6.00 – 7.00 pm : Presentation
Venue: Ilam Homestead (formerly University Staff Club) , 87 Ilam Road, Christchurch
You are welcome to buy drinks at the bar
Investment:  – $5.00 – Members & Affiliates (HRINZ, AITD, NSANZ, TechCommNZ, ICFA, IABC, NZOQ, CDANZ, DEANZ)
– $10.00 – Non-Members

 

Introductory Data Analysis Workshop Using R

The Statistical Consulting Unit is having another run of its popular `Data Analysis Using R´ workshops.

The workshops are free and directed primarily at postgraduate students and members of staff, who need to improve their data analytic skills.

The next Introductory Data Analysis Workshop will take place on Tuesday 9 and Wednesday 10 July between 10am – 3pm, and will cover fundamental statistical concepts, such as sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, p-values and confidence intervals, as well as introduce linear regression and analysis of variance (ANOVA). No prior knowledge of R is required.

To register or for further information, please write to Daniel Gerhard at daniel.gerhard@canterbury.ac.nz.

Building Meaningful Resilience at Work

Attend this 1.5 hour session on designing a more holistic approach to building resilience at work.

Date: Thursday 20 June 2019
Time: 5.30pm – 6.00pm registrations, and 6.00pm – 7.00pm Presentation
Venue: Ilam Homestead, in the upstairs meeting room
Cost: $5.00 entry fee
Organisers: New Zealand Association for Training and Development

During this workshop, Building Meaningful Resilience at Work, Kathryn Jackson will share her accidental journey into the world of resilience at work, explore how to create a more tailored approach for your business and hopefully convince you to consider a universal approach for your training solutions in this area.

Expect to leave with:

    • A better understanding of what wellbeing and resilience at work is
    • Some tools and resources that you can use immediately
    • Ideas for how you might design a more holistic approach to building resilience at work.

Click here to register for the event.