Videos

Māpura Māori – Reo Māori in a minute!

Māpura means fire, flash or spark

Delivered to your email inbox each fortnight Te Waka Pākākano | Office of the AVC Māori, Pacific and Equity will provide a small video clip called Māpura Māori – Reo Māori in a minute –  a short, informal pronunciation lesson to assist you with the correct pronunciation of some of our UC events, publications, programmes, places and spaces.

Māpura Māori is designed to both spark your motivation and provide you with a better understanding of the meaning behind many of these names and phrases – so that you build your bicultural competence and confidence while giving reo a go!

Kia iti te kupu, kia nui te whakaaro – capitalising on the micro-moments of opportunity that are available in our busy days, we have set ourselves a challenge – to provide you with a snippet of support via a video clip, in only 90 seconds or less. You will also find a link to an audio file so that you are able to click, listen, learn and let your ārero (tongue) practice the pronunciation in the privacy of your own home or office space.

Kia kaha tatou ki te tū ki te tahi – kia kaha tō tatou reo Māori!

Tū ki te tahi means to ‘stand as one’.

Click below to listen and practice your pronunciation for “Tū ki te tahi”.

Tū ki te tahi is an excerpt taken from the Ngāi Tahu whakataukī: “Whakahaua tō iwi, kia tū ki te tahi” which translates to ‘encourage your people to stand as one’.

In naming our staff pānui Tū ki te tahi, we acknowledge this fortnightly email as an opportunity for us all as UC whānau to engage and be empowered by the information shared so that we increase our knowledge on how to continue making a difference in our community, locally and globally – tangata tū, tangata ora.

UC Connect Public Lecture: A cross-examination of rape myths

Despite more than 40 years of law reform aimed at improving the experience of giving evidence for adult rape complainants, Ministry of Justice research in 2018 re-confirmed that the process remains distressing and re-traumatising.

In the recent UC Connect public lecture A cross-examination of rape myths, UC Law Professor Elizabeth McDonald presented an overview of the findings, some reform proposals and an outline of future work.

Missed this session? Watch the video here:
Note: you may be asked to confirm your age and/or sign in to view.

NCEA Japanese Day Dance-Off Largest Ever

Over 400 students and teachers from UC and 16 Waitaha Canterbury high schools attended the 2019 NCEA Japanese workshop.

During this year’s event, students and staff took part in creating a unique video project that can be considered Aotearoa New Zealand’s largest group dance by Japanese learners.

Dancing collaboratively to a Japanese pop song is a great way to connect Waitaha Canterbury’s young and enthusiastic learners of Japanese while creating a sense of belonging to a Japanese learning community.

Check out the amazing job they did here>