All posts by dwe24

Celebrating Fresh Thinking, Professorial Lecture Series

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution to academe made by Professor Bronwyn Hayward and Professor Timothy Sullivan in the next presentation in the Professorial Lecture Series for 2020.

Date: Thursday, 29 October, from 4.30 – 6.00 p.m.
Location: E14 – Engineering

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend this lecture, to actively support our new Professors, and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

Presentation details:

“Ecological Citizenship for a School Strike generation”
Presented by Professor Bronwyn Hayward, Political Science and International Relations.

How to support young people as citizens in chaotic climate futures is an urgent question. While thousands of young New Zealanders have joined global peers in climate protests, and growing numbers of New Zealanders agree climate change is a pressing concern, we still know little about which learning experiences and capabilities young citizens need to help them face disruptive climate futures. In this presentation Bronwyn Hayward develops her ‘SEEDS’ model of ‘strong ecological citizenship’ for a school strike generation. The SEEDS of citizenship education encourage students to develop skills for; Social agency, environmental education, Embedded justice, Decentred deliberation and Self-transcendence. Hayward argues a SEEDs approach can support young citizens’ democratic imagination and develop their ‘handprint’ for social justice.


“Seismic Design of Buildings: Historical Developments and New Horizons”
Presented by Professor Timothy Sullivan, Department of Civil & Natural Resources Engineering.

Ten years after the Canterbury earthquake sequence began, this lecture examines how our seismic design approaches for buildings have developed over the past century and discusses what changes may be on the horizon to better quantify, communicate and mitigate seismic risk. As part of this discussion, the development of so-called displacement-based design will be described as well as risk-targeted seismic design procedures. The talk also explains how innovative building technologies can lead to improved seismic performance but not without a suitable seismic design approach. As part of this, I will illustrate some of the contributions we have made to the development of improved seismic design procedures and identify what are considered key research needs.

Professor Ian Wright
Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research | Tumu Tuarua Rangahau

Celebrating Fresh Thinking: Professorial Lecture Series

Join me in celebrating the very substantive contribution to academe made by Professor Annette Mills and Professor Thomas Wilson in the next presentation in the Professorial Lecture Series for 2020.

Date: Thursday, 10 September, from 4.30 – 6.00 p.m.
Location: E14 – Engineering Core

I encourage all staff and postgraduate students to attend this lecture, to actively support our new Professors, and take the opportunity to appreciate the fantastic research being undertaken in parts of the university we may be less familiar with.

Presentation details:

“My Home, My Castle – The New Frontline for Enterprise Cybersecurity” – Presented by Professor Annette Mills, Department of Accounting & Information Systems

It is said that people are the weakest link in IT security. But today – we have a new frontline – the home computer user. Indeed the home office and other forms of remote working are changing how and where we work, blurring the lines of enterprise IT security. As user mobility increases and people become more untethered from office settings, the opportunities for security breaches increases. Unlike the challenges of bring-your-own-device (BYOD), working remotely or from home opens up many security risks as users move between different devices. Indeed, studies show that since the pandemic, attacks on home users have risen five-fold, and while people are often aware of, they are not necessarily concerned about, the risk of a security breach. Furthermore unlike what many may think, adequate security does not come with our devices. Additional software, selecting suitable passwords, avoiding public wifi, and being vigilant about the apps we download are critical.

In this presentation we will talk about the attitudes, perceptions and actions of home computer users, how users perceive security threats and coping responses, and share findings from recent research.

“Digging Deeper into Disasters” – Presented by Professor Thomas Wilson, Department of Geological Sciences

Disasters are an uncomfortably familiar part of life in Aotearoa-New Zealand. Despite considerable efforts to mitigate and prepare, disaster impacts cause extreme and complex challenges for our communities, organisations and our nation.

Understanding the likely impacts of disasters is essential for an evidence-based approach to disaster risk reduction strategies. Lessons from here and around the world suggest we need to: consider disaster risk as a dynamic process which changes through time; go beyond simply assessing impacts to a building or asset, but rather consider disaster impacts across interconnected human, natural and infrastructural systems; and develop new metrics which better capture the human impact of disasters.

With these considerations in mind, this talk will present interdisciplinary approaches to assess disaster impacts for some of Aotearoa-New Zealand’s biggest natural hazard risks, including Auckland Volcanic Field, Taranaki volcano, the Alpine fault, and large tsunami. It will also showcase some of the ‘unique’ disaster research capabilities we have developed as part of this work, including combining volcanic ash with high-voltage electricity, attacking houses with ballistic cannons, and using CCTV to assess people’s reactions during strong earthquake shaking.

The final part of the talk will offer perspectives on future opportunities, including the need to effectively incentivise disaster resilience decisions and the need to partner across science, practitioner and policy sectors.


Professor Ian Wright
Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research | Tumu Tuarua Rangahau