Category Archives: UC News

Purchasing materials from the School of Fine Arts

UC is changing the way you buy materials from the School of Fine Arts.

What you need to know ……..

  • Buy materials online via the College of Arts Products web-page using Visa or MasterCard.
  • Provide your order number when you pick up your materials. Your order number can be found in the order notification email sent to you when you pay for the materials.
  • Pickup locations are still the same and are displayed on the College of Arts Products web-page.
  • Canterbury Card can no longer be used to pay for materials. Please do not top-up your Canterbury Card with funds specifically for this purpose.
  • Materials can be purchased in person at the School of Fine Arts Block 1 or Block 2, using EFTPOS/Debit card, MasterCard or Visa.

Contact Sarah Brown (sarahe.brown@canterbury.ac.nz) in the School of Fine Arts if you have any queries.

 

EMAIL | COVID-19 Alert Level 2: Protecting yourself and others

The Government has this afternoon confirmed that COVID-19 Alert Level 2 will continue for Aotearoa New Zealand until 11.59pm on Monday 21 September, pending cabinet confirmation earlier on Monday.

We anticipated this outcome, so there will be no change to the guidelines already in place for Term 4. To remind yourself of what this means for UC, follow this link>

Minimising risk to you, our students and UC whānau remains our primary focus. Here are just four things you can do to ensure you’re best protecting yourself and others while you’re on campus: 

  1. Prioritise contact tracing

Please use the Government’s NZ COVID Tracer app, or your Canterbury Card, to scan into every building and lecture theatre you enter on campus. Download the NZ COVID Tracer app now.
QR codes are plentiful inside lecture theatres and other spaces, so please encourage students not to crowd entrance ways and maintain physical distancing as they enter venues, and scan the code/s once inside.

  1. Physical distancing and designated seating

Room capacities will be limited to ensure physical distancing and stickers will be used to show where to sit.

A physical distance of 1m should be maintained at all times.

In no situation should students be asked to ignore physical distancing guidelines. If you have any concerns about this, email ucprotect@canterbury.ac.nz.

  1. Face coverings

You play a vital role in encouraging students to wear a face covering while in lectures and other teaching situations, and are expected to wear one – you are not however expected to enforce the wearing of face coverings.

Face coverings help to protect you and others when you are unable to maintain physical distancing, by stopping droplets from spreading when you speak, laugh, cough or sneeze. Information on how to make a DIY face covering can be found here>

Face coverings do not need to be worn by people with a disability or physical or mental health condition which makes it difficult to wear a face covering. Check out this video from the UCSA Exec team for more: https://youtu.be/9X1qXn4qJiY

  1. Maintain good hygiene
  • Cough or sneeze into your elbow or cover your mouth and nose with a tissue.
  • Put used tissues into the bin or a bag immediately after use
  • Wash your hands with soap and water often
  • Try to avoid close contact with people who are unwell
  • Don’t touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean
  • Look at scientific facts, not hype and,
  • If you’re sick, please don’t come to campus.

See the email sent to students today here

For more information, visit UC’s COVID-19 webpage and if you have any questions or concerns, email UCprotect@canterbury.ac.nz.

Upcoming Prestigious Postgraduate Travelling Scholarship Opportunities

The following three prestigious postgraduate travelling scholarships are open now and close 1 November, 2020. 

They provide exciting opportunities for graduates in Arts, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physics or a medical/health-related field to undertake further postgraduate study at either a UK institution in the case of the Sims Empire Scholarship, or an overseas institution in the case of the Tytheridge Travelling Scholarship in Arts and the Lord Rutherford Memorial Research Fellowship.

These opportunities will take place in 2021, subject to the opening of borders at the time. 

Eligible applicants can read the regulations and login and apply at the following links now:

Lord Rutherford Memorial Research Fellowship

Sims Empire Scholarship

Tytheridge Travelling Scholarship in Arts

For more information please contact: scholarships@canterbury.ac.nz

Two new UC Māori language resources for kaimahi

To celebrate Te Wiki o te Reo Māori this year, in addition to attending one of our Māori Language Week events or activities , Te Waka Pākākano are launching two new rauemi reo (Māori language resources) designed to support you with using and valuing te reo in your everyday mahi.

The UC Te Reo Māori Style Guide, available as both a downloadable and printable PDF and an easy to use webpage, is now available on the UC Style Guide website. The Reo Māori Style has been developed by the UC Ohu Reo and is a helpful handbook for UC staff on how to ensure the use of te reo Māori across all our UC publications, social media and marketing is accurate and consistent.  Look out for the tohu (icon) that symbolises te reo Māori which has a waha (mouth) and ārero (tongue).

The second rauemi reo, available on Te Waka Pākākano | Office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor Māori AKO | LEARN site, is a Karakia booklet.  The Karakia booklet includes a selection of karakia for kaimahi (staff) of UC to support them with beginning and closing hui, and to indicate appreciation for kai (food).  Useful sound files to help you with pronunciation are also included and you can also print or save a copy as a downloadable PDF.

Nā reira, e ngā manu kōrihi, e ngā manu korokī o tō tātou whare wānanga nei!
Kia hāro tō tātou reo Māori anō nei he kāhu ki runga i ngā mānia o Waitaha!
Tēnā, tukua kia rere ki te ao!

Putting the gown in ‘Town and Gown’

 

After keenly taking on the survey project, our team set out to begin searching for heritage artefacts around the University. Graduate Women Canterbury, an organisation with nearly 100 years of history associated with the University, became the ideal place for us to start.

GWC is widely known these days for tirelessly coordinating the regalia for all Canterbury, Lincoln and Ara graduates every year.  We paid a visit to Jean Sharfe and her team at GWC earlier this month to examine a number of artefacts in their care.

Jean, who is the author of Players, Protestors and Politicians: A History of the University of Canterbury Students’ Association (Canterbury, 2015), was a fount of knowledge on the history of both the University and its historical artefacts.

She provided us with information about two illustrious academic gowns and several trenchers for the survey, as well as a stock of original University of New Zealand regalia hoods and what looks to be an old regalia storage box.

Pictured is an academic gown thought to have been worn by the University Registrar, sometime prior to 1957, for graduation ceremonies. The gown is a rich olive green with dark red and gold trimming, and it was made for someone rather tall.

A similar black gown, thought to be worn by the Vice-Chancellor for graduation ceremonies, is about ten centimetres shorter.

We are unsure yet, however, whether these gowns were personally made for the Registrar and Vice-Chancellor at the time. Perhaps a study into the height of all Registrars and VCs at Canterbury is next on the cards for our project surveyors!

The University of New Zealand graduate hoods were another point of interest. Within the collection were original bachelor’s degree hoods with a fur trim.

Jean explained that bachelor’s graduates were forced to line up for their ceremonies outside in the cold, and so their hoods were adapted to allow any falling snow to blend in. Master’s graduates, however, could line up under cover.

Jean also revealed that the grey material used for Canterbury graduation hoods today was specifically designed to represent the greywacke stone of the surrounding Canterbury landscape.

The discoveries at Graduate Women Canterbury have been a successful addition to the survey project.

We look forward to venturing out to more Departments over the coming weeks, so please do not hesitate to contact us if you would like to provide any information about heritage artefacts that may be of interest.

Gown image credit: Copyright University of Canterbury
James Logie image credit: courtesy of the Steven Family

Amy Boswell-Hore, collection technician.
Natalie Looyer, collection technician.