Taking a break? Lock your device

When you step away from your computer, make sure you lock it. We’re not suggesting your colleagues can’t be trusted, but what if you’re out of the room, and then they leave the room too? Suddenly everything on your computer is available to anyone who passes by. Someone could: send malicious emails that are apparently from you; steal files; install and send viruses from your machine; install malware that steals your credentials; and many other destructive things – all of which you could be held accountable for because you “left the front door of your computer open”.

Anytime you step away from your computer, even just to grab a coffee or go to the bathroom, lock your computer.

Below are shortcuts to lock your Windows, Linux and Apple Mac computers:

Windows

  • Press ‘Windows + L’ (for Lock).
  • Alternatively, press Ctrl + Alt + Del, then click Lock this computer.

Linux

  • Press the Super key, and ‘L’ (for ‘Lock’). So that’s Win + L.
  • Or if you are running an older version of Linux use Ctrl + Alt + L.

Mac

  • Press ‘Control + Shift + Eject’ or ‘Control + Shift + Power’.

It is shocking what someone can do with your identity: they can get access to EVERYTHING you do on your device which in turn can take a massive toll on the University and you individually, and damage your relationships.

  • You could find all your data has been deleted or encrypted and held for ransom
  • The University network could be locked down – stopping staff and students from being able to work – and requiring millions of dollars and weeks or months to fix
  • You could lose access to your banking and social media accounts
  • Your identity could be stolen
    • Loans and credit cards may be opened in your name
    • Unauthorised purchases may be billed to you
    • You may become a victim of tax fraud
    • You may be locked out of apps and web-based services, forever!! (Losing family photos, thesis papers etc.)
    • Your electronic devices may be used as a tool of cyber-crime (sending spam or spreading malware)

Find out more about cyber security at UC here>

How to report a cybersecurity incident

If you have any questions, feel free to contact the IT Service Desk. Call us on our free call number 0508 UC IT HELP (0508 824 843) or on 03 369 5000.

Tips to spot a phishing scam

Can you imagine the headache you’d have if a hacker got access to your social media, banking, dating, or email login details? But you wouldn’t just hand this kind of information over to a stranger would you?

Hmm, here are some basic tips to spotting a scam.

Consider these before opening an email that you weren’t expecting to receive.

  • Is the spelling and grammar in the message correct?
  • Does the link and the text match (hover your mouse over the link and you’ll see where it really goes).
  • Does the email urge you to take immediate action?
  • Does the email address of the sender look reasonable given the content of the email?
  • Look at the salutation (does it say ‘Dear Customer’)?
  • Look at the signature, a lack of details or how you can contact the company suggests phishing.
  • Are you even expecting an email from that sender?
  • Is the message asking you to do something unusual? (eg. buy iTunes cards).

Together we can make a difference, but what should you do next?

If you think it’s a phishing email or spam:

If the message is plausible:

  • go to the website of the service, or bank yourself (don’t click that link in the email), then log in and see if you have any messages
  • if it’s someone sharing a file or similar with you, contact the person (in a new email not by using ‘reply’) and ask them.

If you’re not be sure, treat it with caution and report it

It it amazing what hackers can do with access to your device, they get access to EVERYTHING you do on that device which can take a massive toll on you individually and damage your relationships.

  • You could lose access to your banking and social media accounts.
  • You could find all your data has been deleted or encrypted and held for ransom.
  • Your identity could be stolen,
    • loans and credit cards may be opened in your name.
    • unauthorised purchases may be billed to you.
  • You may become a victim of tax fraud.
  • You may be locked out of apps and web-based services, forever!! (Losing family photos, thesis papers etc).
  • Your electronic devices may be used as a tool of cyber-crime (sending spam or spreading malware).

See more about cyber security at UC>

Type Using Macrons

Macrons are an important part of writing te reo Māori accurately. They indicate vowel length. Vowel length can change meaning.

To type a macron, tap the ~ key followed by the vowel that you wish to place a macron above. eg,  ~+a = ā~+A = Ā

Note: the ~ key, or tilde key, is just below the Esc key in the upper left corner of the computer keyboard

Macrons will only work if you have first enabled macrons on the computer or device you wish to use macrons on. To configure your Outlook email to display macrons  consistently you need to set Outlook’s Options to use something called Unicode UTF-8 encoding. Never heard of it? I hadn’t either! Don’t worry, it’s a simple process and here’s how:

PC: http://smallbusiness.chron.com/setting-outlook-use-utf8-32242.html

MAC: Go to your Mac’s Outlook Preferences > Composing. Then look for the label Preferred encoding for new messages and select Unicode (UTF-8).

My colleagues and I have written some other Tech Tips for macrons that you may find useful too: Te tohutō: The macron and how to enable the Māori keyboard Type on an iPad using Macrons with a Bluetooth keyboard Type on an iPhone or iPad using Macrons Type on a Samsung Galaxy S4 using Macrons


Check out our Archive of Tech Tips – open it and hit the “End” key on your keyboard to jump to the end of the Archive list where the most recent Tips are. Was this tip helpful to you? Anything else you want to know? Please leave a  comment below. You’ll find more learning at Learning and Development

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