Videos

Knowledge Commons: 150 projects of impact

In June Professor Ekant Veer was seconded into a role in the Vice-Chancellor’s Office to start working on the ‘Knowledge Commons’. In this video Ekant and Dr Susannah Stevens give a quick update on what they’ve been doing and how the knowledge commons can be used as one way to achieve the institutional strategic goal of being an ‘Engaged University’. Please do contact Ekant on ekant.veer@canterbury.ac.nz if you’d like to know more or help with sharing some of your stories of impact in the community.

Māpura Māori – Puaka, Matariki e!

Tīpuna Māori, Māori ancestors, read the rising of whetū (stars) in alignment with lunar phases of the moon, the māramataka, in order to better understand the nature of coming seasons.

Of important significance to Ngāi Tahu, Puaka – also known as Rigel – is a blue-white star seen above the constellation of Tautoru, or Orion’s Belt.  Marking the end of the tītī (mutton bird) and tuna (eel) season, these taonga species are still gathered today as part of mahinga kai or traditional Ngāi Tahu food gathering practices.

While many iwi acknowledge different narratives about whetū in different ways, the rising of Te Iwa o Matariki, a cluster of nine stars during mid-winter, signals the start of a new year.  Traditionally during this time of year, crops were harvested, and seafood and birds which had been collected, were stored away.

The rising of Matariki marks an ecological shift in season.  It is a time to reflect and remember those of our loved ones who passed on in the previous twelve months, and signals a time for us to plan and set intentions for the twelve months ahead.

Here on campus, Puaka is the name given to our UC Library building – Puaka-James Hight, and Matariki is the name of our central Registry building.  Alongside other UC buildings which carry the names and narratives of navigation and exploration, the characteristics of whetū and celestial bodies have been overlaid across our campus in order to provide a map for our ākonga (students) and kaimahi (staff) as they journey through campus, their studies and experiences here with us at Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha.

Ka rewa a Matariki ki runga, ka piri te aitanga a Tiki
When Matariki rises above, humanity gathers.

Click below to listen and practice your pronunciation of the word Matariki.

Click below to listen and practice your pronunciation of the word Puaka.

Māpura Māori – Reo Māori in a minute!

Māpura means fire, flash or spark

Delivered to your email inbox each fortnight Te Waka Pākākano | Office of the AVC Māori, Pacific and Equity will provide a small video clip called Māpura Māori – Reo Māori in a minute –  a short, informal pronunciation lesson to assist you with the correct pronunciation of some of our UC events, publications, programmes, places and spaces.

Māpura Māori is designed to both spark your motivation and provide you with a better understanding of the meaning behind many of these names and phrases – so that you build your bicultural competence and confidence while giving reo a go!

Kia iti te kupu, kia nui te whakaaro – capitalising on the micro-moments of opportunity that are available in our busy days, we have set ourselves a challenge – to provide you with a snippet of support via a video clip, in only 90 seconds or less. You will also find a link to an audio file so that you are able to click, listen, learn and let your ārero (tongue) practice the pronunciation in the privacy of your own home or office space.

Kia kaha tatou ki te tū ki te tahi – kia kaha tō tatou reo Māori!

Tū ki te tahi means to ‘stand as one’.

Click below to listen and practice your pronunciation for “Tū ki te tahi”.

Tū ki te tahi is an excerpt taken from the Ngāi Tahu whakataukī: “Whakahaua tō iwi, kia tū ki te tahi” which translates to ‘encourage your people to stand as one’.

In naming our staff pānui Tū ki te tahi, we acknowledge this fortnightly email as an opportunity for us all as UC whānau to engage and be empowered by the information shared so that we increase our knowledge on how to continue making a difference in our community, locally and globally – tangata tū, tangata ora.

UC Connect Public Lecture: A cross-examination of rape myths

Despite more than 40 years of law reform aimed at improving the experience of giving evidence for adult rape complainants, Ministry of Justice research in 2018 re-confirmed that the process remains distressing and re-traumatising.

In the recent UC Connect public lecture A cross-examination of rape myths, UC Law Professor Elizabeth McDonald presented an overview of the findings, some reform proposals and an outline of future work.

Missed this session? Watch the video here:
Note: you may be asked to confirm your age and/or sign in to view.