Tag Archives: Student life

Cheaper student bus fares now here!

Metro has launched a huge new discount for uni students. You can now save 40% off travel if you have a Tertiary Student Metrocard.

With public transport now half price across the country until January 2023, that means you can travel within Ōtautahi Christchurch for only 75 cents on the bus. Top that! 

All you need to do is order your brand new free card here (you’ll need your UC login details for this).  You’ll be notified once your card is ready to be picked up from the UCSA counter at Haere-roa on Level 2. 

To be eligible for the Tertiary Student Metrocard, you have to be enrolled at UC for at least one semester. 

The discount is a 2-year trial, so let’s make it a success and travel sustainably! 

Check out the Metrocard website for more information here.  

The Code of Practice for the Pastoral Care of Students is here to support you

The Code (formally known as the  Education (Pastoral Care of Tertiary and International Learners) Code of Practice 2021) supports the wellbeing and safety of all students. It covers topics like physical safety and inclusion, access to advice and support services, physical and mental health support, support for transition into and out of university study, student accommodation requirements, and having opportunities for students to have their voices heard. 

Student with disabilities still face barriers at uni, such as accessibility issues on campus or ableist attitudes from other students or members of staff.  The Code helps disabled students and their whānau to hold their university accountable, to ensure that they can access the support services they need. 

If you have any concerns about your wellbeing and safety at UC, you should discuss these in with Student CareUCSA, or UC’s Grievance Coordinator

Find out more about the Code at UC here

Get the lowdown on academic integrity

To be a successful student, you need to show academic integrity: acting honestly, ethically, fairly and respecting others throughout your learning experience. It’s important to take charge and avoid making mistakes which can hinder your education.

Plagarism

When you’re asked to use examples in your assessments, it can be hard to know how to avoid plagiarism. Simply put, plagiarism is copying materials from another source (whether it’s a quote or data) without a clear acknowledgement of the original source.

It’s important to reference properly as all assignments are checked through UC’s anti-plagiarism software, Turnitin, which highlights when students have copied other authors’ work without citation.

Top tips:

  • Using quotation marks to quote someone is not plagiarism, as long as the source is acknowledged.
  • Check on AKO | LEARN to see which style of referencing your lecturer would like you to use for each assignment. This will inform how you cite your references and avoid plagiarism. You can read style guides for referencing here>
  • Feeling lost? Te Pokapū Pūkenga Ako | The Academic Skills Centre run workshop on avoiding plagiarism throughout the year. You can learn more and book here>
  • If you’d like specific advice, or the session dates don’t work for you, you can also make a one-on-one consultation with a learning advisor here>

Cheating

Breaking the rules for assignments or exams is treated very seriously and can result in expulsion.

It’s important to know what you can bring to exams, how they will run and whether or not you can use equipment such as calculators, which may need to be authorised by UC before use. 

Get prepared and read up on the key information around examination instructions here>

Building on your skills 

If you’re looking for quick tips on how to improve your writing or study skills, you can learn more here, with Te Pokapū Pūkenga Ako’s helpful handouts.

On AKO | LEARN you can also access UC Skills – the central place for all your online academic skills help. With courses on academic writing, referencing and stats management (to name just a few), UC Skills helps you get ahead and feel confident about your mahi (work).

When we work together to act honestly, ethically and respect each other and our work, we get the most out of our studies. You can learn more about academic integrity here.