Tag Archives: Wellbeing

Protect yourself and your whānau from flu this winter

Flu, also known as influenza, affects your whole body. Symptoms can come on suddenly and can include fever, chills, muscle aches, runny nose, cough, shortness of breath, and stomach upsets. It can keep you in bed for a week or more, and you might become very sick.

With the borders shut for over two years, we’ve been protected from Covid-19 and a whole heap of viruses, including flu. However, this means we don’t have immunity in our communities, and as Aotearoa reconnects with the world during the winter months, we’re all more at risk of catching the flu this year. There’s a real possibility of having flu and Covid-19 within a short space of time. Don’t risk it, there are some steps you can take to protect yourself and your whānau from becoming ill.

Get your flu jab
Getting vaccinated means you are far less likely to get infected, less likely to get sick, and you’re less likely to pass it on. Win win!

You can get vaccinated at your GP practice or your local pharmacy – find your closest one here>

If you are enrolled with the UC Health Centre, you can get your vaccine for free. Please be aware that there is at least a two week wait for appointments at the Health Centre due to high demand.

Stay home if you’re feeling sick
If you’re feeling a bit under the weather, or have any respiratory symptoms, the best thing to do is stay at home. Going to your mate’s party this weekend might be tempting, but you could pass the virus to your friends. Stay home, and make sure you and your mates are well enough to enjoy what winter has to offer.

When you are at home, take care of yourself and rest. You can catch up on all your lecture recordings on AKO | LEARN when you’re feeling better. 

Hygiene hacks
You can follow these simple hygiene practices to help keep you safe and stop the spread of viruses:

  • Wash your hands regularly for at least 20 seconds and dry them for 20 seconds, or use an alcohol-based hand rub
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth
  • Don’t share drinks
  • Avoid crowded places
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, then put the tissue in a lined bin
  • Keep wearing a face mask when out and about.

Hidden treasures on campus

How often do you take time to appreciate the cool spots around UC? We have a beautiful campus, and with autumn here there’s a lot admire. 

Our wellbeing coordinator Timothy Rowe took a wander around campus and found some great spots to enjoy: 

The first hidden treasure was by Te Ao Mārama, in the awa | river, where there are some tuna | eels. Consider taking some time to visit and watch the eels swim, under the rushing water. 

Longfin eels are considered a tonga, an important cultural treasure for Māori and need to be respected. When visiting it is important to instil the appropriate level of respect and care for them. This means please don’t touch the eels. 

Another hidden treasure is a wall of ivy with a ton of little birds on it on Elsie Locke that is easy to miss and walk by without noticing, but if you stop and pay attention it is a hive of bird activity.  Just another one of those things it’s easy to miss/not know about, but which when you stop and notice is actually pretty cool!

TURNING FAILURE INTO SUCCESS

Looking back at his early political career, Barack Obama reflected:

“I first ran for Congress in 1999, and I got beat. I just got whooped. I had been in the state legislature for a long time, I was in the minority party, I wasn’t getting a lot done, and I was away from my family and putting a lot of strain on Michelle. Then for me to run and lose that bad, I was thinking maybe this isn’t what I was cut out to do. I was forty years old, and I’d invested a lot of time and effort into something that didn’t seem to be working.”

President Barack Obama 

Unfortunately, failure does happen, and sometimes it happens in relation to things we really care about. When it does, we can always ask: what is the next best thing we could do?

Obama decided that, for him, it was to stop worrying whether he was succeeding or failing and focus on the work ahead. This seems to have helped, and 10 years later he was elected as the first African American President of the United States. He followed this up four years later with re-election for a second Presidential term in 2013.

While most students will hopefully feel pretty good after the release of Term 1 results, it’s to be expected that some will not. If you find yourself in that position, I really want to encourage that there are things you can positively do.

In working out what that ‘next best thing’ actually is, here are three pieces of advice:

  1. Deal with the feels: take time out to manage whatever you’re feeling, whether it’s disappointment or frustration or annoyance. Failure can suck, so do positive things for yourself to offset that. Spend time with friends and whānau, get outdoors, watch your favourite Netflix series…
  2. Evaluate the situation: instead of putting it out of mind, put a detective hat on and assess what might have gone wrong. Did you put in enough study and preparation? Did you misread the exam and give answers that didn’t address the questions? Were you running at less than 100% due to circumstances out of your control, like sickness or a breakup? Did you ask your lecturers and tutors enough questions?
  3. Make a plan of action: having come up with a list, you now need to take practical action. What could you control or do differently next time? What extra steps could you take or put in place? You might find it really helpful to talk with support staff for their advice – they can offer objective, honest suggestions to help.

Want to know more about fear of failure? There’s lots to it – check out more info here.

Tim Rowe
Kairuruku Oranga | Wellbeing Coordinator
Wellness Services