Tag Archives: Health and wellbeing

Important information for week starting 18 March 2019

We know Friday’s events continue to have a deep impact on people, and we are committed to supporting the safety and wellbeing of all students and staff. Our love and support are with everyone. Help is available and you are not alone.

The University will be operating as usual from Monday 18 March, however all tests and assignments from 16-24 March have been cancelled. Course coordinators will be in touch with further information. New Zealand Police have asked people to return to their daily lives, but to also be vigilant. Let us take care of ourselves and one another.

Tomorrow, to welcome everyone back to campus and to provide an outreach service, UCSA and SVA volunteers will be stationed on street corners in the Ilam area around the University campus between 10am – 11.30am and 1.30pm – 3pm.

A drop in support centre for students and staff will continue operating next week, Monday to Friday, 10am – 2pm, in Puaka-James Hight Library.

As an act of solidarity and support we invite the UC community to band together for a period of reflection, and to support one another.

Band Together
Time:
12 – 12.30pm
Date:
Monday 18 March
Location: C Block lawn
RSVP: https://www.facebook.com/events/2288962974706666/

The gathering will open with a moment of silence and karakia and will be followed by the sharing of halal kai. There will be time to pause and quietly reflect on the past few days, as well as leave a message on the Kia Kaha wall.

As an act of solidarity and to unite in a demonstration of inclusiveness, female students and staff are welcome to wear head scarves. This is a matter of personal choice.

  • Classes scheduled between 12pm – 1pm have been cancelled.
  • Lectures scheduled from 11am – 1pm will run from 11am – 12pm.
  • Lectures scheduled from 12pm – 2pm will run from 1pm – 2pm.
  • You can support each other in your learning through study groups and sharing resources, particularly during this week.

The UC community includes students and staff from over 80 different countries and nationalities. We support institutions, policies and practices that protect and promote individuals on the basis of who they are and what they do, not on the basis of the colour of their skin, their sexuality, religious beliefs or who their parents were.

We are committed to learning and will continue to work and improve inclusiveness for all. As we look toward the future, all UC students and staff can be assured that without exception the University will not tolerate racism or harassment of any kind.

Kia kaha, kia māia, kia manawanui | Be strong, be brave, be steadfast

Professor Cheryl de la Rey
Vice-Chancellor | Tumu Whakarae

Seeking support

There are a number of services on campus you can contact for help at UC:

Health and Fitness during exam time

Make sure you keeping moving while you study.  It’s good for your mind, body and soul, according to Gary, Sports Development Coordinator at UC Sport.

Here’s some tips from the Rec Centre>

Remember, the RecCentre has changed their timetable over exam time.  Make sure you check the timetable before heading to your favourite classes>

Ideas for planning and studying – before exams

Part of the struggle of the exam studying period is being able to organise and plan your time in order to get the most out of your study.

Louise Orcheston-Findlay from the Academic Skill Centre (ASC) teaches revision and exam skills. She has some top tips to get you thinking about how to find out how you study best> 

Here are some top tips from the Academic skill centre on how to study well in a short amount of time:

Review your notes by reading actively – concentrate on what you are reading

Concentrate on learning what you don’t know.  If you give yourself a small test, you will find out your “weak” areas.

Think of questions that may be asked.  Practice on old exam papers.

Try question and answer sessions with others – you may need to limit chat times or competition with other students in these  sessions.

Use Rhymes or mnemonics as memory aids

Put things into your own words.  This helps you to know if you have actually understood the information

Let family and friends know that your increased time spent studying does not mean disregard for them and ask for their cooperation in your timetable.

Know the dates and times of exams you will be sitting.